Myth of Time: Months
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MONTHS

The Roman year originally had ten months, a calendar which was ascribed to the legendary first king, Romulus. Tradition had it that Romulus named the first month, Martius, after his own father, Mars, the god of war. This month was followed by Aprilis, Maius, and Iunius, names derived from deities or aspects of Roman culture. Thereafter, however, the months were simply called the fifth month (Quintilis), sixth month (Sixtilis) and so on, all the way through to the tenth month, December...
DATABASES
The Roman year originally had ten months, a calendar which was ascribed to the legendary first king, Romulus. Tradition had it that Romulus named the first month, Martius, after his own father, Mars, the god of war. This month was followed by Aprilis, Maius, and Iunius, names derived from deities or aspects of Roman culture. Thereafter, however, the months were simply called the fifth month (Quintilis), sixth month (Sixtilis) and so on, all the way through to the tenth month, December...
The modern Gregorian calendar has roots in the Roman calendar, specifically the calendar decreed by Julius Caesar. So, the names of the months in English all have Latin roots. Note: The earliest Latin calendar was a 10-month one, beginning with March; thus, September was the seventh month, October, the eighth, etc. July was originally called Quintilis, meaning fifth; August was originally called Sextilis, meaning sixth...
Today, we follow the Gregorian calendar, but it’s based on the ancient Roman calendar, believed to be invented by Romulus, who served as the first king of Rome around 753 BC. The Roman calendar, a complicated lunar calendar, had 12 months like our current calendar, but only 10 of the months had formal names. Basically, winter was a “dead” period of time when the government and military wasn’t active, so they only had names for the time period we think of as March through December...
The original Roman year had 10 named months Martius 'March', Aprilis 'April', Maius 'May', Junius 'June', Quintilis 'July', Sextilis 'August', September 'September', Octobe'October', November 'November', December 'December', and probably two unnamed months in the dead of winter when not much happened in agriculture. The year began with Martius 'March'. Numa Pompilius, the second king of Rome circa 700 BC, added the two months Januarius 'January' and Februarius 'February'...
Only a few names of the month were actually derived from Roman deities; most simply came from the numbers of the months or — in two cases — in honor of Roman emperors...
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