Psychle: An Earth Day | Sunset
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SUNSET

That eternal cycle of light and dark created our archetypical patterns of thinking and feeling about the Magic Hour. Sunset symbolizes the end of something – of the light, a stage or condition in one’s life, or the end of life itself. The forms, colors, and textures of the world blossom one last time in the setting sun before they fade into oblivion.
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That eternal cycle of light and dark created our archetypical patterns of thinking and feeling about the Magic Hour. Sunset symbolizes the end of something – of the light, a stage or condition in one’s life, or the end of life itself. The forms, colors, and textures of the world blossom one last time in the setting sun before they fade into oblivion.
The time of sunset is defined in astronomy as the moment when the upper limb of the Sun disappears below the horizon. Near the horizon, atmospheric refraction causes sunlight rays to be distorted to such an extent that geometrically the solar disk is already about one diameter below the horizon when a sunset is observed. As viewed from everywhere on Earth, the equinox Sun sets due west at the moment of both the Spring and Autumn equinox. As viewed from the Northern Hemisphere, the sun sets to the northwest (or not at all) in the Northern hemisphere's spring and summer, and to the southwest in the autumn and winter; these seasons are reversed for the Southern Hemisphere.
The role of the Hesperides in Greek mythology though, was as guardians, for these nymphs tended the Garden of Hera (or the Garden of the Hesperides).
 
The Garden of Hera was a sacred place, and was famously home to the Golden Apples of Greek mythology, and possibly an orchard grown from the original Golden Apples. The original golden apples had been presented to Hera by the goddess Gaia, when Hera had wed Zeus; and it was the Golden Apples that was said to give the golden tinge of sunsets.
In Greek mythology, the Hesperides (/hɛˈspɛrɪdiːz/; Ancient Greek: Ἑσπερίδες [hesperídes]) are the nymphs of evening and golden light of sunsets, who were the "Daughters of the Evening" or "Nymphs of the West". They were also called the Atlantides (Ἀτλαντίδων) from their reputed father, the Titan Atlas.

They are sometimes called the Western Maidens, the Daughters of Evening or Erythrai, and the "Sunset Goddesses", designations all apparently tied to their imagined location in the distant west.
In ancient times, Izumo was recognized as a sacred place where the sun sets. People in Izumo considered the sunset sacred and prayed to it with awe. The tradition of celebrating the beautiful sunset over the sea has been passed down from generation to generation.
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