Psychle: An Earth Day | Noon
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NOON

The word noon is derived from Latin nona hora, the ninth canonical hour of the day, in reference to the Western Christian liturgical term none, one of the seven fixed prayer times in traditional Christian denominations. The Roman and Western European medieval monastic day began at 6:00 a.m. (06:00) at the equinox by modern timekeeping, so the ninth hour started at what is now 3:00 p.m. (15:00) at the equinox. In English, the meaning of the word shifted to midday and the time gradually moved back to 12:00 local time - that is, not taking into account the modern invention of time zones. The change began in the 12th century and was fixed by the 14th century. Solar noon is the time when the Sun appears to contact the local celestial meridian. This is when the Sun reaches its apparent highest point in the sky, at 12-noon apparent solar time, and can be observed using a sundial. The local or clock time of solar noon depends on the longitude and date.
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The word noon is derived from Latin nona hora, the ninth canonical hour of the day, in reference to the Western Christian liturgical term none, one of the seven fixed prayer times in traditional Christian denominations. The Roman and Western European medieval monastic day began at 6:00 a.m. (06:00) at the equinox by modern timekeeping, so the ninth hour started at what is now 3:00 p.m. (15:00) at the equinox. In English, the meaning of the word shifted to midday and the time gradually moved back to 12:00 local time - that is, not taking into account the modern invention of time zones. The change began in the 12th century and was fixed by the 14th century. Solar noon is the time when the Sun appears to contact the local celestial meridian. This is when the Sun reaches its apparent highest point in the sky, at 12-noon apparent solar time, and can be observed using a sundial. The local or clock time of solar noon depends on the longitude and date.
At the noon hour he arrives at midlife, where, established in society to some degree, he feels his productive powers operating at full strength.

But just when the sun is at its brightest, its trajectory changes.  Though many hours of daylight still lie ahead — the whole afternoon, perhaps the best part of the day — a crucial psychological shift now occurs.  Where the young person in his ascent saw only blue sky up ahead, now the ground below comes into view.
Poludnitsa (from Russian: Polden or Poluden, 'half-day' or 'midday') is a mythical character common to the various Slavic countries of Eastern Europe. She is referred to as Południca in Polish, Полудница (Poludnitsa) in Serbian, Bulgarian and Russian, Polednice in Czech, Poludnica in Slovak, Připołdnica in Upper Sorbian, and Полознича (Poloznicha) in Komi, Chirtel Ma in Yiddish, Poludnitsa is a noon demon in Slavic mythology. She can be referred to in English as "Lady Midday", "Noonwraith" or "Noon Witch". She was usually pictured as a young woman dressed in white that roamed field bounds. She assailed folk working at noon causing heatstrokes and aches in the neck, sometimes she even caused madness.
A meridian is an imaginary line running from the North Pole to the South Pole along the Earth's surface. It connects all locations that share the same longitude, meaning that they are exactly north or south of each other. The line running from one pole to the other via your location is your local meridian.

Solar noon happens at your location when the Earth's rotation brings your local meridian to the side of the planet that faces the Sun. From your perspective, the Sun, after having steadily gained altitude since sunrise, now reaches the top of the arch that its journey describes in the sky every day. At this moment, it appears due south, due north, or in the zenith position exactly above you, depending on your latitude and the time of year.
From Middle English noen, none, non, from Old English nōn (“the ninth hour”), from a Germanic borrowing of classical Latin nōna (“ninth hour”) (short for nōna hōra), feminine of nōnus (“ninth”). Cognate with Dutch noen, obsolete German Non, Norwegian non.
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