top of page

Our Storied Selves

Updated: May 27, 2021

I want to share one paragraph from the Introduction to my new book, which I hope to publish in the next two months: The Way of Myth: Stories' Subtle Wisdom. I have been working on it since March, 2020 when the pandemic hit. The paragraph, I hope, stirs some thoughts in you about your own narrative self. Here it is:

"Stories define us; some of them try to destroy us; others bolster our sense of ourselves and our relation to others. Pay attention to the kinds of stories that draw you into them, as into an interactive field, and you will garner indications of who you once were, are now, and who you aspire to be. Stories aid us in remembering ourselves as well. How often in reading a story--ancient, classic, popular, or modern--a long-forgotten memory will suddenly loom up with such force that you may stop reading the current plot on the screen or in your hands, and pivot into this personal slice of your history to contemplate it through the prism of the story you are presently attending to." Dennis Patrick Slattery

6 Comments


Dennis:


I have enjoyed your comments as a panelist during the Myth Salon sessions. Good luck with your upcoming book. I think there is HUGE potential for this new venue for posting ideas and getting feedback. -- Rob Anglin

Like

I note the edit and believe "interactive field" works much better.

Like

Sometimes a force field must be overcome, before the vortex pulls you inward.

Like

Dennis, congratulations on being so close to publishing your book. Your first paragraph is gripping, and oh so true. I will purchase your book and look forward to reading it., based on who you are and this compelling first paragraph.

Interesting point Victoria made. I liked the simile, however I am an Intuitive on the Meyers Briggs and so think of a force field as something powerful that could draw you in or repel you. A Sensate would be more aware of what it actually does.

Like

jinaustin
jinaustin
May 27, 2021

Yes! 🤗

Like
bottom of page