Sir Lamorak
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SIR LAMORAK

Sir Lamorak /læmərɪk/ (or Lamorac(k), Lamorat, and other spellings) is a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian legend, a son of King Pellinore and brother of Percival, Tor, Aglovale, and sometimes the Grail maiden Dindrane and others.[1][2] Introduced in the Prose Tristan, Lamorak reappears in later works including the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. Malory refers to him as Arthur's third best knight, only inferior to Lancelot and Tristan, but Lamorak was not exceptionally popular in the romance tradition, confined to the cyclical material, subordinate to more prominent characters.
DATABASES
Sir Lamorak /læmərɪk/ (or Lamorac(k), Lamorat, and other spellings) is a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian legend, a son of King Pellinore and brother of Percival, Tor, Aglovale, and sometimes the Grail maiden Dindrane and others.[1][2] Introduced in the Prose Tristan, Lamorak reappears in later works including the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. Malory refers to him as Arthur's third best knight, only inferior to Lancelot and Tristan, but Lamorak was not exceptionally popular in the romance tradition, confined to the cyclical material, subordinate to more prominent characters.
Lamorak was the son of a king named Pellinore, who was, himself, also one of Arthur’s knights. Lamorak was the brother of the much more famous Percival, the knight who famously searched for the Holy Grail. Another one of Lamorak’s brothers was Aglovale, who also served as one of Arthur’s knights. In fact, he was the eldest of Pellinore’s legitimate children. Sir Tor was another of Lamorak’s brothers, although the earliest records actually portray him as the son of a man named Aries. It is only in later tales that Tor is made the son of Pellinore. Dornar is another of Lamorak’s brothers, and he seems to be the most insignificant in the tales. Finally, Lamorak was also said to have had a sister named Dindrane.
He is the son of king Pellinore and the second born of his brothers. He was named after his uncle and is the brother of Percival, Aglovale, Dornar, Alain and Tor. He was referred to as the most Noblest of knights. He was listed and referred to as the third strongest knight only ever inferior to Tristan, the second strongest, and Lancelot, the strongest. This means he’s even more powerful than Gawain at full power seeing how he comes into a later play within Lamoraks story. In type moon he is stronger than Gawain but isn’t listed as the third best knight.

Lamorak grew up and became a knight of the round serving under King Arthur. He fought in a jousting tournament overtaking 30 knights while Tristan overtook 40 and Lancelot 50.
Introduced in the Prose Tristan, Lamorak reappears in later works including the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. His father, one of King Arthur's earliest allies, had killed King Lot of Orkney in battle; ten years later, Lot's sons Gawain and Gaheris retaliated by slaying Pellinore in a duel. Lamorak, who has grown up to join the Round Table, exacerbates the families' blood feud by having an affair with Lot's widow, Morgause, whose son Gaheris catches the lovers in flagrante delicto while staying at Gawain's estate and promptly beheads her, letting her unarmed lover go. Lamorak reappears at a tournament and explains the situation to Arthur, but rejects the king's promise of a truce. When he rides off, he is ambushed by Gawain, Gaheris, Agravain, and Mordred; ultimately it is Mordred who delivers the blow that kills him. His cousin, Sir Pinel le Savage, later attempts to avenge Lamorak's murder by poisoning Gawain at Guinevere's dinner party, but the poison is accidentally taken by another knight (whose kinsman blames the queen and tries to have her executed).

He was known for his strength and fiery temper.
Sir Lamorak was a younger son of King Pellinore of Listinoise. His epithet means ‘of Wales’ but at this period refers to the whole of Britain. He was known as the third greatest Knight of the Round Table, following Sirs Tristram and Lancelot. On a number of occasions he is recorded as having beaten over thirty knights in a tournament: notably at Sir Gareth’s wedding feast and when travelling with Sir Driant in the Cornish lands of King Mark. After the latter encounter, the troublesome monarch had Sir Tristram fight the exhausted Lamorak. The young King of Lyonesse reluctantly agreed and managed to dismount his opponent, but he refused to dishonour himself further by carrying on. Lamorak was extremely put out by Tristram's courtesy and was still fuming when he encountered a messenger bearing Morgan le Fay's infidelity-seeking drinking horn to King Arthur's Court.
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