Gawain
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GAWAIN

Gawain (/ɡəˈweɪn/; Welsh: [ˈɡawain]), also known as Gawaine or Gauwaine, among various other forms and spellings, is King Arthur's nephew and a Knight of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. Under the name Gwalchmei, he is introduced very early in the legend's literature, being mentioned in some of the earliest Welsh Arthurian sources. As Gawain and related variants, he appears in Latin, French, English, Dutch, German, Spanish and Italian texts, notably as the protagonist of the story of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Other tales of Gawain include Historia Regum Britanniae, Roman de Brut, De Ortu Waluuanii, Diu Crône, The Awntyrs off Arthure, Ywain and Gawain, Golagros and Gawane, L'âtre périlleux, Le Chevalier à l'épée, and The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnelle, as well as the works of Chrétien de Troyes and the prose cycle Lancelot-Grail.
DATABASES
Gawain (/ɡəˈweɪn/; Welsh: [ˈɡawain]), also known as Gawaine or Gauwaine, among various other forms and spellings, is King Arthur's nephew and a Knight of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. Under the name Gwalchmei, he is introduced very early in the legend's literature, being mentioned in some of the earliest Welsh Arthurian sources. As Gawain and related variants, he appears in Latin, French, English, Dutch, German, Spanish and Italian texts, notably as the protagonist of the story of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Other tales of Gawain include Historia Regum Britanniae, Roman de Brut, De Ortu Waluuanii, Diu Crône, The Awntyrs off Arthure, Ywain and Gawain, Golagros and Gawane, L'âtre périlleux, Le Chevalier à l'épée, and The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnelle, as well as the works of Chrétien de Troyes and the prose cycle Lancelot-Grail.
Sir Gawain was generally said to be the nephew of King Arthur. Gawain’s parents were King Lot of Orkney and Morgause (though his mother is said to be Anna in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History of the Kings of Britain). Upon the death of King Lot, Gawain became the head of the Orkney clan, which includes in many sources his brothers Agravain, Gaheris, and Gareth, and his half-brother Mordred.
Gawain, hero of Arthurian legend and romance. A nephew and loyal supporter of King Arthur, Gawain appeared in the earliest Arthurian literature as a model of knightly perfection, against whom all other knights were measured. In the 12th-century Historia regum Britanniae, by Geoffrey of Monmouth, Gawain (or Walgainus) was Arthur’s ambassador to Rome; his name (spelled “Galvaginus”) is carved against one of the figures on the 12th-century archivolt of Modena cathedral in Italy. In the verse romances of Chrétien de Troyes in the 12th century, he was never a hero but always a leading character who displayed outstanding prowess, which was, however, surpassed by that of Lancelot (who was inspired by the power of courtly love) and by that of the Grail-winner Perceval (who received spiritual inspiration).
Among the most famous Knights of the Round Table, Sir Gawain is considered among the top three in most of the Arthurian legends. According to these legends, he was among the earliest knights to have joined King Arthur’s order of the Round Table.

Sir Gawain was King Arthur’s nephew and most of the Arthurian literature portrays him as a formidable but compassionate knight who is well-versed in the art of healing with the use of different herbs. Many stories also associated him closely with the Sun so that his strength waxed and waned as the Sun rose and set.
The story’s protagonist, Arthur’s nephew and one of his most loyal knights. Although he modestly disclaims it, Gawain has the reputation of being a great knight and courtly lover. He prides himself on his observance of the five points of chivalry in every aspect of his life. Gawain is a pinnacle of humility, piety, integrity, loyalty, and honesty. His only flaw proves to be that he loves his own life so much that he will lie in order to protect himself. Gawain leaves the Green Chapel penitent and changed.
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