Gemini
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GEMINI

THE DIOSKOUROI (Dioscuri) were the star-crowned, twin gods of St. Elmo's fire--an electrical discharge which appears on the rigging of ships portending deliverance from a storm. They were also gods of horsemanship and protectors of guests and travellers.

The twins were born as mortal princes, sons of the Spartan queen Leda by Zeus and her husband Tyndareus. Because of their kindness and generosity they were apotheosised at death. Polydeukes (Polydeuces), being a son of Zeus, was at first the only one offered this gift but he insisted it be shared with his twin Kastor (Castor). Zeus agreed, but in order to appease the Fates, the twins had to spend alternate days in heaven and the underworld.

The Dioskouroi were also placed amongst the stars as the constellation Gemini (the Twins). The division of their time between heaven and the underworld might be a reference to the heavenly cycles--for their constellation is visible in the sky for only six months of the year.

The Dioskouroi were depicted as youthful horsemen with wide-brimmed traveller's hats.
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THE DIOSKOUROI (Dioscuri) were the star-crowned, twin gods of St. Elmo's fire--an electrical discharge which appears on the rigging of ships portending deliverance from a storm. They were also gods of horsemanship and protectors of guests and travellers.

The twins were born as mortal princes, sons of the Spartan queen Leda by Zeus and her husband Tyndareus. Because of their kindness and generosity they were apotheosised at death. Polydeukes (Polydeuces), being a son of Zeus, was at first the only one offered this gift but he insisted it be shared with his twin Kastor (Castor). Zeus agreed, but in order to appease the Fates, the twins had to spend alternate days in heaven and the underworld.

The Dioskouroi were also placed amongst the stars as the constellation Gemini (the Twins). The division of their time between heaven and the underworld might be a reference to the heavenly cycles--for their constellation is visible in the sky for only six months of the year.

The Dioskouroi were depicted as youthful horsemen with wide-brimmed traveller's hats.
The constellation of Gemini is made up of two twins: Castor and Pollux. Castor was the mortal son of King Tyndarus, while Pollux was the immortal son of Zeus. Both Castor and Pollux, being identical twins, were inseparable in their looks and actions. Castor was great horseman and Pollux was a great fighter. Together, they went with Jason on the Argo and saved the ship from a terrible storm. When Castor was killed in battle, Pollux pleaded with Zeus to bring him back. Zeus agreed to immortalize both Castor and Pollux, if they spend half of their time on the Earth and the other half amongst the stars in the heavens. Since then, when sailors saw these two stars together, they knew their journey would be prosperous. However, seeing only one star foretold bad luck.
The twins were Castor and Polydeuces (Pollux). Together, they were known as the Dioscuri. Their sisters were Helen and Clytemnestra. They were the sons of Leda and Zeus and Tyndareus. Castor and Pollux were half-brothers. Leda was married to King Tyndareus of Sparta. At this time, she was also seduced by Zeus, so the father's of both children were uncertain. The Discouri were inseperable and grew closer with age. 

Castor was a famous horsetamer and Pollux, a superb boxer. When Castor was killed during a battle, Pollux was inconsolable and gave up his own life to be with his brother. Zeus rewarded their love by placing their images among the stars, where they shine side by side. Two lines of stars makes up this constellation, and two bright stars at the top of each line represent Castor and Pollux's heads.
This zodiacal constellation represents the twins Castor and Polydeuces (Pollux to the Romans). These were born from an egg after their mother, Leda, Queen of Sparta, had been seduced by Zeus, disguised as a swan. Although only half brothers, Castor, the mortal son of Leda's husband, King Tyndareus, and Polydeuces, immortal son of Zeus, were extremely close and together took part in many adventures. Sadly, on one of these Castor was killed. Polydeuces avenged Castor's murder, but was so overcome with grief that he begged to be allowed to be with his brother in the underworld. Zeus, knowing the strength of their feelings, and for once showing some compassion, granted this request. He placed the twins side by side in the heavens so that they could alternate their time together between Hades and the home of the gods.
The Zodiac sign of Gemini represents the ancient Greek myth of the twin brothers  Kastor (Κάστωρ) and Polydeukes (Πολυδεύκης), in Latin, Castor and Pollux, by which they are usually known. The Greeks referred to them jointly as the Dioskouroi (Dioscuri in Latin), meaning ‘sons of Zeus’.
 

The night sky thrilled the ancient Greek astrologers who played a huge role in what we now know today about the shape and size of the Earth, the moon, the position of constellations and how they move, the orbital paths of planets and their correlation with the stars around them.

In ancient Greece, each one of the twelve signs of the zodiac (the word zodiac comes from a Greek word meaning, “The circle of animals” meaning all living creatures), related to one of the four elements: earth, air, fire and water and identified with twelve constellations, seen in the night sky at different times of the year.

With the exception of Libra, each zodiac sign relates to a Greek myth concerning animals or humans, telling how each group of stars arrived in the heavens.
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