Sir Kay
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SIR KAY

Sir Kay was the son of Sir Ector (Ectorious) and the foster brother of King Arthur. History records Kay (Cai in Welsh) as being a very tall man and a fierce warrior, as shown by his epithet, the Tall. He appears in the Mabinogion tale of “Culhwch and Olwen” as the foremost warrior at the Court of the King Arthur. According to other legends, Sir Kay had mystical powers and was called one of the “Three Enchanter Knights of Britain”.

Later on this was written about Sir Kay:

“Nine nights and nine days his breath lasted under water, nine nights and nine days would he be without sleep. A wound from Cai’s sword no physician might heal. When it pleased him, he would be as tall as the tallest tree in the forest. When the rain was heaviest, whatever he held in his hand would be dry for a handbreadth before and behind, because of the greatness of his heat, and, when his companions were coldest, he would be as fuel for them to light a fire”.
DATABASES
Sir Kay was the son of Sir Ector (Ectorious) and the foster brother of King Arthur. History records Kay (Cai in Welsh) as being a very tall man and a fierce warrior, as shown by his epithet, the Tall. He appears in the Mabinogion tale of “Culhwch and Olwen” as the foremost warrior at the Court of the King Arthur. According to other legends, Sir Kay had mystical powers and was called one of the “Three Enchanter Knights of Britain”.

Later on this was written about Sir Kay:

“Nine nights and nine days his breath lasted under water, nine nights and nine days would he be without sleep. A wound from Cai’s sword no physician might heal. When it pleased him, he would be as tall as the tallest tree in the forest. When the rain was heaviest, whatever he held in his hand would be dry for a handbreadth before and behind, because of the greatness of his heat, and, when his companions were coldest, he would be as fuel for them to light a fire”.
Sir Kay is always described as King Arthur's seneschal (an official in charge of domestic arrangements in the medieval household and overseer of the servants). He is usually shown as boorish, mocking, and cruel. In a number of romances, Kay's insults inspire the hero to prove Kay wrong by undertaking a quest. Despite his rude character, Kay holds a position of honor in Arthur's court, which suggests the Round Table may not be as ideal as it is described. Or perhaps Arthur's inexplicable favor toward Kay may derive from early Celtic sources, from the story "Culhwch and Olwen" in the Mabinogion, for example, in which Cei has extraordinary powers of transformation and great physical strength; he is also able to breathe under water for nine days and nine nights. In many of the Arthurian stories, Kay is both epic warrior and wicked seneschal, an amalgam of two stereotypes. A modern version of Kay may be seen in Disney's Sword in the Stone:
Sir Kay was the son of King Uther's friend, Sir Ector, and therefore became the foster-brother of the young King Arthur who joined the household as a baby in order to keep him safe from would-be assassins. The two grew up together.

In his late teens, Kay entered a London tournament, with Arthur acting as his page. The latter pulled the prophetic sword from the stone at the event and Kay tried to claim the credit until his father discovered the truth.

With Arthur subsequently being crowned High-King of Britain, Kay rose to prominence at the royal court. He is said to have had mystical powers which must have come in handy in his new position as the King's steward and Count of Anjou. He was called one of the 'Three Enchanter Knights of Britain'
In Arthurian legend, Sir Kay /ˈkeɪ/ (Welsh: Cai, Middle Welsh Kei or Cei; Latin: Caius; French: Keu; French Romance: Queux; Old French: Kès or Kex) is King Arthur's foster brother and later seneschal, as well as one of the first Knights of the Round Table. In later literature he is known for his acid tongue and bullying, boorish behaviour, but in earlier accounts he was one of Arthur's premier warriors. Along with Bedivere, with whom he is frequently associated, Kay is one of the earliest characters associated with Arthur.[1] Kay's father is called Ector in later literature, but the Welsh accounts name him as Cynyr Ceinfarfog.
Sir Kay was the foster brother of King Arthur and son of Sir Ector in the romances of King Arthur. Arthur made Kay his seneschal (A steward in charge of the household or estate of a medieval lord or prince.)

Kay first appears in the early Welsh stories as Cei, Kai, Cai, or Gai, and his name is thought to be based on the Roman Caius. Thses chronicles depict Kay as Arthur's most trusted knights, along with Bedivere and Gawain. In later legends he becomes Arthur's foster brother. But by the time Excalibur became part of the Arthurian legend, the prominence of Kay had lessened (much as happened to Bedivere and Gawain). The character of Kay also begins to worsen in later tales, such as his claim to have pulled the sword from the stone. However he does continue to be portrayed as a constant and loyal companion of King Arthur.

Kay is supposed to have been based at Caer Gai, in Snowdonia (Caer Gai is just north of the town of Llanuwchllyn).
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