Mind-Body Myths
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MIND-BODY

The conversation about mind and its relationship with body is shared by philosophers and storytellers, who began poeticizing their dualistic tensions well before the analysis of Socrates or Descartes. The creation of humans from clay, dough, stone or metal becomes, in Frankenstein, the creation of a creature from dead bodies, which exaggerates the common distinction in these myths of matter as inert. This is in contrast with the breath, fire, lightning or starlight that brings life, consciousness, and animation.

Frankenstein is the Modern day Prometheus, whose creature is likened to Adam and whose work is inspired by Alchemy. Perhaps the greatest forerunner to Frankenstein’s monster is Prague's Golem, the creation of a Jewish alchemist who plays God by modeling what might be seen as the awakening of a Homunculus after God’s work on Adam. Like Frankenstein’s monster, the Golem is out of control. Like the broom in Fantasia, unstoppable water carrying results in flooding. Both can be compared with the opening of Pandora's Box, which is a crucial element in the Promethean myth about seizing creative power from the gods.

Now, we see these characters in the form of robots and AI’s who may or may not be conscious – Data from Star Trek, Ava from Ex Machina, David from the Alien franchise, C3PO in Star Wars, Bicentenial Man, iRobot, and so on. Many of the stories pay homage to the other characters in their family. Ultron, for example, from the Marvel franchise, is presented as a Frankenstein monster who declares there, “are no strings on me.” Still, we continue to love and fear the animation of simple wooden puppets and ceramic dolls--from Mannequin and Weird Science to Chucky and Pinnocchio.*

No matter the character – from Pandora to Frankenstein and DC’s cyborg – the recurring poesis around creatures created by humans concerns the question of our own soul and its relationship with a creator. Are we more than our flesh? Our matter? Is there a part of us that comes from or goes somewhere beyond this life? Do we have free will? The story of Data, Pinocchio and Bicentenial Man wanting to be as humans is a displacement of humans wanting to be ensouled. Their quest for a conversation with their demiurge is a reflection of our desire to meet our maker(s).

*Ultimately, Japetto is a creator made in the image of his animator, a human, who was created in the image of his creator, Prometheus, who was created in the image of his creator, Iapetus, who shares a name with Japeth, a son of Noah, who, like Deucalion--a clay creature made by Prometheus--was saved from the flood.
DATABASES
The conversation about mind and its relationship with body is shared by philosophers and storytellers, who began poeticizing their dualistic tensions well before the analysis of Socrates or Descartes.  The creation of humans from clay, dough, stone or metal becomes, in Frankenstein, the creation of a creature from dead bodies, which exaggerates the common distinction in these myths of matter as inert. This is in contrast with the breath, fire, lightning or starlight that brings life, consciousness, and animation.

Frankenstein is the Modern day Prometheus, whose creature is likened to Adam and whose work is inspired by Alchemy. Perhaps the greatest forerunner to Frankenstein’s monster is Prague's Golem, the creation of a Jewish alchemist who plays God by modeling what might be seen as the awakening of a Homunculus after God’s work on Adam. Like Frankenstein’s monster, the Golem is out of control. Like the broom in Fantasia, unstoppable water carrying results in flooding. Both can be compared with the opening of Pandora's Box, which is a crucial element in the Promethean myth about seizing creative power from the gods. 

Now, we see these characters in the form of robots and AI’s who may or may not be conscious – Data from Star Trek, Ava from Ex Machina, David from the Alien franchise, C3PO in Star Wars, Bicentenial Man, iRobot, and so on. Many of the stories pay homage to the other characters in their family. Ultron, for example, from the Marvel franchise, is presented as a Frankenstein monster who declares there, “are no strings on me.” Still, we continue to love and fear the animation of simple wooden puppets and ceramic dolls--from Mannequin and Weird Science to Chucky and Pinnocchio.* 

No matter the character – from Pandora to Frankenstein and DC’s cyborg – the recurring poesis around creatures created by humans concerns the question of our own soul and its relationship with a creator. Are we more than our flesh? Our matter? Is there a part of us that comes from or goes somewhere beyond this life? Do we have free will? The story of Data, Pinocchio and Bicentenial Man wanting to be as humans is a displacement of humans wanting to be ensouled. Their quest for a conversation with their demiurge is a reflection of our desire to meet our maker(s). 

*Ultimately, Japetto is a creator made in the image of his animator, a human, who was created in the image of his creator, Prometheus, who was created in the image of his creator, Iapetus, who shares a name with Japeth, a son of Noah, who, like Deucalion--a clay creature made by Prometheus--was saved from the flood.
The mind–body problem is a debate concerning the relationship between thought and consciousness in the human mind, and the brain as part of the physical body. It is distinct from the question of how mind and body function chemically and physiologically, as that question presupposes an interactionist account of mind–body relations.[1] This question arises when mind and body are considered as distinct, based on the premise that the mind and the body are fundamentally different in nature.
According to Qur'an 23:12, God created man from clay.

In Jewish folklore, a golem (Hebrew: גולם) is an animated anthropomorphic being that is created entirely from inanimate matter usually clay or mud.

In Sumerian mythology, the gods Enki or Enlil create a servant of the gods, humankind, out of clay and blood (see Enki and the Making of Man). In another Sumerian story, both Enki and Ninmah create humans from the clay of the Abzu, the fresh water of the underground. They take turns in creating and decreeing the fate of the humans.

According to Egyptian mythology, the god Khnum creates human children from clay before placing them into their mother's womb...
Another frequent objection against theories like CRTT, originally voiced by Wittgenstein and Ryle, is that they merely reproduce the problems they are supposed to solve, since they invariably posit processes—such as following rules or comparing one thing with another—that seem to require the very kind of intelligence that the theory is supposed to explain. Another way of formulating the criticism is to say that computational theories seem committed to the existence in the mind of “homunculi,” or “little men,” to carry out the processes they postulate.
If then, consciousness, or mind, in something like its traditional sense, cannot successfully be explained away by the new epistemology, we must resolutely face the metaphysical question of the relation of the mind to the physical world in which it has its setting. The central and crucial part of this question is, of course, to be found in the mind-body problem… If we refuse to accept the pan-objective epistemology already considered which would do away with consciousness in the traditional sense, we must recognize that the relation of the mind to the body forms a real and inescapable problem… How can two things so different from each other as mind and body interact? To which, it seems to me, the sufficient answer is to be found in the rather obvious query, Why can they not? Are we so sure that unlike things cannot influence each other? The only way really to decide this question is to go to experience and see...
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