Yom Kippur
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THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

Yom Kippur means Day of Atonement. It is the most sacred and solemn day in the Jewish calendar.

Yom Kippur is a day to reflect on the past year and ask God's forgiveness for any sins. Jews do not work or go to school on this day.

Yom Kippur is nine days after Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which celebrates the anniversary of the creation of the world.


What is the story of Yom Kippur?
When the Israelite's left Egypt, they went to Mount Sinai. Moses climbed to the top of the mountain and God gave him two tablets with the Ten Commandments on them.

The first commandment told people that they should not worship anyone other than God. However, when Moses went down the mountain, he found the Israelites worshiping a golden calf.

Moses was so angry that he threw the sacred tablets on the floor and they shattered. The Israelites then atoned for their wrongdoing. God forgave them and gave Moses a second set of tablets.
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Yom Kippur means Day of Atonement. It is the most sacred and solemn day in the Jewish calendar.

Yom Kippur is a day to reflect on the past year and ask God's forgiveness for any sins. Jews do not work or go to school on this day.

Yom Kippur is nine days after Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, which celebrates the anniversary of the creation of the world.


What is the story of Yom Kippur?
When the Israelite's left Egypt, they went to Mount Sinai. Moses climbed to the top of the mountain and God gave him two tablets with the Ten Commandments on them.

The first commandment told people that they should not worship anyone other than God. However, when Moses went down the mountain, he found the Israelites worshiping a golden calf.

Moses was so angry that he threw the sacred tablets on the floor and they shattered. The Israelites then atoned for their wrongdoing. God forgave them and gave Moses a second set of tablets.

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Yom Kippur , the Day of Atonement, falls nine days after Rosh Hashanah and concludes the Ten Days of Awe (Yamim Nora’im). Yom Kippur is a solemn day of prayer and fasting on which Jews pray for spiritual purification from past transgressions. The liturgy for Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah is found in the Mahzor, the High Holiday prayer book.
Just months after the people of Israel left Egypt in the year 2448 from creation (1313 BCE), they sinned by worshipping a golden calf. Moses ascended Mount Sinai and prayed to G‑d to forgive them. After two 40-day stints on the mountain, full Divine favor was obtained. The day Moses came down the mountain (the 10th of Tishrei) was to be known forevermore as the Day of Atonement—Yom Kippur.

That year, the people built the Tabernacle, a portable home for G‑d. The Tabernacle was a center for prayers and sacrificial offerings. The service in the Tabernacle climaxed on Yom Kippur, when the High Priest would perform a specially prescribed service. Highlights of this service included offering incense in the Holy of Holies (where the ark was housed) and the lottery with two goats—one of which was brought as a sacrifice, the other being sent out to the wilderness (Azazel).

For nearly 26 hours we “afflict our souls”: we abstain from food and drink, do not wash or apply lotions or creams, do not wear leather footwear, and abstain from marital relations. Instead, we spend the day in synagogue, praying for forgiveness.
Yom Kippur (/ˌjɒm kɪˈpʊər, ˌjɔːm ˈkɪpər, ˌjoʊm-/;[1] Hebrew: יוֹם כִּיפּוּר‎, romanized: Yom Kipur, IPA: [ˈjom kiˈpuʁ], lit. 'Day of Atonement'; plural יום הכיפורים, Yom HaKipurim) is the holiest day of the year in Judaism. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a day-long fast, confession, and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services.
Our Rabbis taught, “There were no days as joyful for the Jews as Yom Kippur and Tu b’Av (a kind of Jewish romantic holiday).” (Mishnah Ta’anit 4:8). Despite being a serious day, Yom Kippur is, well, happy. Rabbi Zvi Teitelbaum of Mesorah D.C. puts it well, “We call it the zissen ashamnu,” – the sweet confession. As any who have ever loved know, apology is not a tragedy. To ask for forgiveness is to birth renewal and to recover intimacy. Yom Kippur is the day where we reconnect with God and each other. Of all the year, it is the day I love most.
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