Transformational Narrative:
Power of Story
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POWER OF STORY

As you hear a story unfold, your brain waves actually start to synchronize with those of the storyteller, says Uri Hasson, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Princeton University. When he and his research team recorded the brain activity in two people as one person told a story and the other listened, they found that the greater the listener's comprehension, the more closely the brain wave patterns mirrored those of the storyteller.
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As you hear a story unfold, your brain waves actually start to synchronize with those of the storyteller, says Uri Hasson, professor of psychology and neuroscience at Princeton University. When he and his research team recorded the brain activity in two people as one person told a story and the other listened, they found that the greater the listener's comprehension, the more closely the brain wave patterns mirrored those of the storyteller.
Storytelling also helps with learning because stories are easy to remember. Organizational psychologist Peg Neuhauser found that learning which stems from a well-told story is remembered more accurately, and for far longer, than learning derived from facts and figures. Similarly, psychologist Jerome Bruner’s research suggest that facts are 20 times more likely to be remembered if they’re part of a story.

"Your goal in every communication is to influence your target audience (change their current attitudes, belief, knowledge, and behavior). Information alone rarely changes any of these. Research confirms that well-designed stories are the most effective vehicle for exerting influence" (Kendall Haven).
No doubt about it, the best speakers are good storytellers. The best writers are good storytellers. The best leaders are good storytellers. The best teachers and trainers and coaches are good storytellers. It might even be argued that the best parents are good storytellers.

While storytelling is not the only way to engage people with your ideas, it's certainly a critical part of the recipe.
Our brains are hardwired for stories as a way to organize information and help us to orient ourselves. They help make sense of the complex world. Humans are focused on understanding and recognizing patterns and to understand new concepts and ideas. Stories offer such patterns. Stories are built on causes and effects. One event leads to another. We think in narratives all day long. ‘If I take this action, I hope to get this result.’ This is an unconscious, uncontrollable process.

Since the beginning of time, humans educated younger generations using stories. Most part of our existence, all knowledge and values were transferred from generation to generation just by using oral stories.

Stories grab and maintain attention; they help us understand and remember
We live in a sea of information. How can you attract your target audience to listen when they are bombarded with messages every day?

Good stories help people remember messages, not only for five minutes but –if the story is strong enough- for a lifetime. How many stories do you remember from your childhood?
Why is storytelling so important? Because it’s in our DNA. Storytelling is a tool as old as mankind itself. From ancient pantomimed stories shared around caveman campfires, to the Egyptian hieroglyphics, to the written word of the Bible thousands of years ago, storytelling has always been the tool of choice for humans to share its biggest, brightest, and most important ideas. As such, we naturally respond to the power of story. A great story can make us laugh, smile, self-reflect, and so much more.

And for brands that tell the right story to the right group of consumers, it’s a way to build an incredible bond. One that, if nurtured correctly, can last for life.
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