September Birthstone: Sapphire
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SAPPHIRE

Sapphires were said to be named after the Greek word of “Sapphirus” which means blue. The bold, vibrant blue hue of the sapphire. Because of the blue appearance of the sky, many ancient greeks believed that the sky was a reflection of the giant sapphire in which the world was placed upon. Used as a protective measure, the sapphire was thought to contain the power of protection from poisoning and envy. Not only was the sapphire able to provide ancient greeks with protection, but it was said that it was also used as a healing power as well. Thought to harness the power to cure rheumatism, mental illness, colic and even strengthen one’s eyesight, the sapphire was often found in the medical tools of many ancient healers.

Sapphires were also often worn in adornment to connect those to the spirit world. As years passed, sapphires become popular amongst witches and necromancers as they were thought to hold the ability to allow them to see their the “third eye”.
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Sapphires were said to be named after the Greek word of “Sapphirus” which means blue. The bold, vibrant blue hue of the sapphire. Because of the blue appearance of the sky, many ancient greeks believed that the sky was a reflection of the giant sapphire in which the world was placed upon. Used as a protective measure, the sapphire was thought  to contain the power of protection from poisoning and envy. Not only was the sapphire able to provide ancient greeks with protection, but it was said that it was also used as a healing power as well. Thought to harness the power to cure rheumatism, mental illness, colic and even strengthen one’s eyesight, the sapphire was often found in the medical tools of many ancient healers.

Sapphires were also often worn in adornment to connect those to the spirit world. As years passed, sapphires become popular amongst witches and necromancers as they were thought to hold the ability to allow them to see their the “third eye”.
September’s birthstone, the sapphire, is a relative of July’s birthstone, the ruby. Both are forms of the mineral corundum, a crystalline form of aluminum oxide. Red corundum is called ruby. And all other gem-quality forms of corundum are called sapphires. All corundum, including sapphire, has a hardness of 9 on the Mohs scale. That makes sapphire second in hardness only to diamond.

Typically, sapphires appear as blue stones. They range from very pale blue to deep indigo, with the exact shade depending on how much titanium and iron lies within the crystal structure. The most valued shade of blue is the medium-deep cornflower blue. Sapphires also occur in other natural colors and tints – colorless, gray, yellow, pale pink, orange, green, violet and brown – called fancy sapphires. Different kinds of impurities within the crystal cause the various gemstone colors. For example, yellow sapphires get their color from ferric iron, and colorless gems have no contaminants.


The September birthstone has traditionally symbolized sincerity, truth, faithfulness and nobility. For countless centuries, sapphire has adorned royalty and the robes of the clergy. The elite of ancient Greece and Rome believed that blue sapphires protected their owners from harm and envy. Clerics of the Middle Ages wore sapphires because they symbolized Heaven. Ancient Persians believed the earth actually rested on a giant sapphire, which made the sky blue.

The September birthstone was reputed to have healing powers as well. Medieval Europeans believed that sapphire cured plague boils and diseases of the eye. The sapphire birthstone was also thought to be an antidote to poison.
The sapphire has, for centuries, been seen as a symbol of the heavens, a guardian of innocence, a bestower of truth, a promoter of good health, and a preserver of chastity. It is believed to brings gifts of fulfillment, joy, prosperity, inner peace and beauty. Some wore it to ward off illness or as protection while traveling.
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In the middle ages, people believed wearing a sapphire suppressed negative thoughts. It also has been long believed to have a curing power for natural ailments. In ancient Persia, If ground up, it was used as an all purpose medicine. Ivan the Terrible of Russia stated that the sapphire strengthened the heart and muscles and endowed a person with courage. Others said it was an anecdote for poison- it killed snakes on site and if engraved with the figure of a man or a ram, would cure all illness and elevate the owner to a high position.
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In parts of the Orient, Saturday was the day to dress in blue and wear blue sapphire. The color blue and the blue stone indicated wisdom, and generous thinking. It is also associated with the study of heaven and the stars. During the 11th and 12th centuries, sorcerers honored the sapphire more than any other stone as it enabled them to hear and understand the most obscure oracles. Not only did they help to get in touch with astral and psychic realms, but also they provided protection for those who took those journeys.
Sapphire symbolism encompasses diverse subjects in many cultures. Traditionally, people have prized these gems for their celestial blues and violets. These beautiful colors have helped the stone garner many mystical associations. However, you can actually find the beautiful September birthstone in any color, except red.

People have long connected celestial blue sapphires with the planet Venus. By extension, sapphires also represent Friday, the day dedicated to Venus. Springtime also falls under sapphire’s symbolic rubric. In differing zodiacal systems, this gemstone covers both Taurus and Gemini.

The Ancient Greeks associated sapphire with Apollo. Petitioners often wore the gem while consulting oracles, such as the one at Delphi. Supposedly, sapphire taps the power of the “third eye” and makes clear oracular pronouncements otherwise too difficult to hear or understand. Necromancers sought this stone for its purported ability to influence spirits.
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