Psychle: Waking Day
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DREAM PSYCHLE

Sleep & Dream – Beginning with a state of alertness, earthly life wearies until flowers close their petals and creatures close their eyes. Sleep comes, and all animals dream. Eventually, while mostly asleep, the process of awakening begins its course until, finally, earthly life awakes. The presence of sleep fades as we rise until fully alert.
The persistent conditioning of day and night has translated into the sleep and dream of plants, animals and humans. Not all creatures are awake in the daytime, but light is the anchor to rhythms beneath sleep and dream.
Where the dreams of Snow White and Sleeping Beauty remain mysterious, we follow the dreams of Dorothy, and Alice. Wendy’s journey to Neverland is a journey through the stars and to morning—not unlike Osiris’. Dream’s don’t just inform and appear in stories, they give them structure. The journey from day to the dream world and back is like a journey from the nursery to Neverland and home, or from Egypt to the Duat and back.
DATABASES
     Sleep & Dream – Beginning with a state of alertness, earthly life wearies until flowers close their petals and creatures close their eyes. Sleep comes, and all animals dream. Eventually, while mostly asleep, the process of awakening begins its course until, finally, earthly life awakes. The presence of sleep fades as we rise until fully alert.
     The persistent conditioning of day and night has translated into the sleep and dream of plants, animals and humans. Not all creatures are awake in the daytime, but light is the anchor to rhythms beneath sleep and dream. 
     Where the dreams of Snow White and Sleeping Beauty remain mysterious, we follow the dreams of Dorothy, and Alice. Wendy’s journey to Neverland is a journey through the stars and to morning—not unlike Osiris’. Dream’s don’t just inform and appear in stories, they give them structure. The journey from day to the dream world and back is like a journey from the nursery to Neverland and home, or from Egypt to the Duat and back.
Circadian rhythms are 24-hour cycles that are part of the body’s internal clock, running in the background to carry out essential functions and processes. One of the most important and well-known circadian rhythms is the sleep-wake cycle.

Different systems of the body follow circadian rhythms that are synchronized with a master clock in the brain. This master clock is directly influenced by environmental cues, especially light, which is why circadian rhythms are tied to the cycle of day and night.

When properly aligned, a circadian rhythm can promote consistent and restorative sleep. But when this circadian rhythm is thrown off, it can create significant sleeping problems, including insomnia. Research is also revealing that circadian rhythms play an integral role in diverse aspects of physical and mental health.
The sleep-wake cycle refers to the pattern of time we spend awake and asleep every 24 hours. This pattern is one of the body’s many circadian rhythms (1) and is species-specific. For humans, the 24-hour clock is divided between approximately eight hours of sleep and 16 hours of wakefulness. The most significant role of the sleep-wake cycle is to consolidate sleep (2) during the night, helping you stay awake during the day.

In addition to the sleep-wake cycle, other circadian rhythms exist to regulate numerous bodily functions (3) that rise and fall over a 24-hour pattern. Some of these functions include hormone production, core body temperature, energy levels, and appetite.

Circadian rhythms work alongside homeostatic sleep pressure to help guide the sleep-wake cycle. Homeostatic sleep pressure (4), or the need to sleep,  is at its lowest after a night of restful sleep and slowly builds up throughout the day. Strenuous physical or mental work, long hours spent awake, or a compromised immune system can all result in increased sleep pressure. A healthy sleep-wake cycle is achieved when your body’s circadian rhythm and homeostatic sleep pressure are synchronized.
The circadian clock has an internally driven 24-hour rhythm that tends to run longer than 24 hours but resets every day by the sun’s light/dark cycle. Taking melatonina supplements can also shift the timing of the body’s “clock.”

Some people use melatonina as a sleep aid: it has a mild sleep-promoting effect. However, it must be taken at the right time because it can shift the timing of sleep the wrong way. Be aware you may not know the right time to take it after travel across many time zones. Before your deployment, talk to your healthcare provider if you are considering using melatonina.

The internal body clock sets the timing for many circadian rhythms, which regulate processes such as

Sleep/wake cycles
Hormonal activity
Body temperature rhythm
Eating and digesting
Your circadian rhythm helps control your daily schedule for sleep and wakefulness. This rhythm is tied to your 24-hour body clock, and most living things have one. Your circadian rhythm is influenced by outside things like light and dark, as well as other factors. Your brain receives signals based on your environment and activates certain hormones, alters your body temperature, and regulates your metabolism to keep you alert or draw you to sleep.

Some may experience disruptions to their circadian rhythm because of external factors or sleep disorders. Maintaining healthy habits can help you respond better to this natural rhythm of your body.
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