Psychle: Mortal Reproduction
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PROCREATION PSYCHLE

Mature male plants and animals pollenate female plants and animals, at which point the pollen and semen travels deeper into its womb, where new life first sparks. This is called conception for animals and fertilization for plants. Hermaphroditic plants, animals and humans can use male and female organs to pollenate and fertilize both others and themselves. Offspring then grows into fruits and babies, which mature towards sexual adulthood.
The alignment of the reproductive narratives shared by plants, animals and humans bears a cornucopia of familiar metaphors. The earth in which seeds gestate becomes seen as a mother’s womb. To be born is to sprout. To bear fruit is to bear children.
Birds and the bees, which carry out the masculine task of delivering pollen, become seen as male suitors. Flowers—the mature sexual organs of plants—become associated with sexual maturity. This is why Persephone, before abducted by Hades, plucks the narcissus. The flower is a narrative motif that symbolically communicates her stage in life—sexual maturity. Where the flower uses smell to drive its procreation, so do animals, so do humans. We use pheromones—a chemical mating call. Male animals are particularly attracted to the smell of females when they’re in heat or rutting. Despite the analogy’s crudeness, the cycle of a man’s attraction to a woman’s pheromones is driven by her ovulation pattern. A more elegant veneer can be seen in the conflation of perfume and scented flowers with seduction.
The cycles of procreation are prominent in the mythic imagination. This is especially seen in the myths of great mothers—Inanna, Persephone, Mary, Isis, whose journey into the underworld is one of death, begins labor at the bottom. The return from the underworld is then represented by the labor and birth of her child. The return of Persephone is similarly conflated with the birth of her mysterious child, which follows her impregnation by seed from her husband. Isis’ story is mimetic—her conception is associated with the bottom of the Duat, and the birth of her son comes at the end of the journey through death. Like the other divine mothers, Mary was impregnated by a god. And as with Isis, the birth of her child is seen as the bringing of new light into the world.
DATABASES
Mature male plants and animals pollenate female plants and animals, at which point the pollen and semen travels deeper into its womb, where new life first sparks. This is called conception for animals and fertilization for plants. Hermaphroditic plants, animals and humans can use male and female organs to pollenate and fertilize both others and themselves. Offspring then grows into fruits and babies, which mature towards sexual adulthood.
     The alignment of the reproductive narratives shared by plants, animals and humans bears a cornucopia of familiar metaphors. The earth in which seeds gestate becomes seen as a mother’s womb. To be born is to sprout. To bear fruit is to bear children. 
      Birds and the bees, which carry out the masculine task of delivering pollen, become seen as male suitors. Flowers—the mature sexual organs of plants—become associated with sexual maturity. This is why Persephone, before abducted by Hades, plucks the narcissus. The flower is a narrative motif that symbolically communicates her stage in life—sexual maturity. Where the flower uses smell to drive its procreation, so do animals, so do humans. We use pheromones—a chemical mating call. Male animals are particularly attracted to the smell of females when they’re in heat or rutting. Despite the analogy’s crudeness, the cycle of a man’s attraction to a woman’s pheromones is driven by her ovulation pattern. A more elegant veneer can be seen in the conflation of perfume and scented flowers with seduction. 
     The cycles of procreation are prominent in the mythic imagination. This is especially seen in the myths of great mothers—Inanna, Persephone, Mary, Isis, whose journey into the underworld is one of death, begins labor at the bottom. The return from the underworld is then represented by the labor and birth of her child. The return of Persephone is similarly conflated with the birth of her mysterious child, which follows her impregnation by seed from her husband. Isis’ story is mimetic—her conception is associated with the bottom of the Duat, and the birth of her son comes at the end of the journey through death. Like the other divine mothers, Mary was impregnated by a god. And as with Isis, the birth of her child is seen as the bringing of new light into the world.
Human reproduction is any form of sexual reproduction resulting in human fertilization. It typically involves sexual intercourse between a man and a woman. During sexual intercourse, the interaction between the male and female reproductive systems results in fertilization of the woman's ovum by the man's sperm. These are specialized reproductive cells called gametes, created in a process called meiosis. While normal cells contain 46 chromosomes, 23 pairs, gamete cells only contain 23 chromosomes, and it is when these two cells merge into one zygote cell that genetic recombination occurs and the new zygote contains 23 chromosomes from each parent, giving them 23 pairs. A typical 9-month gestation period is followed by childbirth. The fertilization of the ovum may be achieved by artificial insemination methods, which do not involve sexual intercourse. Assisted reproductive technology also exists.
Although organisms are often thought of only as adults, and reproduction is considered to be the formation of a new adult resembling the adult of the previous generation, a living organism, in reality, is an organism for its entire life cycle, from fertilized egg to adult, not for just one short part of that cycle. Reproduction, in these terms, is not just a stage in the life history of an organism but the organism’s entire history. It has been pointed out that only the DNA of a cell is capable of replicating itself, and even that replication process requires specific enzymes that were themselves formed from DNA. Thus, the reproduction of all living forms must be considered in relation to time; what is reproduced is a series of copies that, like the sequence of individual frames of a motion picture, change through time in an exact and orderly fashion.
Myths are reflective of human concerns and needs during ancient times. By reviewing them, it turns out that many human problems today, have a historical background. Among the main themes of ancient mythologies, fertility and reproduction have various representations in ancient civilizations. The purpose of this paper was to review myths and common symbols of fertility and reproduction in ancient civilizations and evaluate the reasons of their continuous importance in different cultures. The data in this review study was obtained by scrutinizing the related literature. The gathered data indicated the multiplicity and variety of fertility symbols in ancient myths. Most ancient fertility symbols were inspired by the nature and some of them like earth and water were common in mythology of different civilizations. Therefore, the symbols consolidate the concept of conformity between human reproductive concerns and the nature's necessities.
Sexual reproduction involves two parents. As you can see from Figure below, in sexual reproduction, parents produce reproductive cells—called gametes—that unite to form an offspring. Gametes are haploid cells. This means they contain only half the number of chromosomes found in other cells of the organism. Gametes are produced by a type of cell division called meiosis, which is described in detail in a subsequent concept. The process in which two gametes unite is called fertilization. The fertilized cell that results is referred to as a zygote. A zygote is diploid cell, which means that it has twice the number of chromosomes as a gamete.
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