Psychle: Mortal Life
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LIFE PSYCHLE

A full-grown life-form will age then die. Such loss is replaced by an egg or flower, which is fertilized. The offspring then grows until born. From birth, the offspring matures until grown. All life shares a journey from birth to death. The narrative experiences of mortal beginnings and ends has been a major conditioned factor through every stage of evolutionary, cultural and psychological development. By definition, this is true anywhere in the universe. The arc of life and death gives form to our own psyches, for which reason stories that engage this narrative pattern engage the patterns of our own psyches.
The abstract pattern of the life cycle enables the alignment of specific life cycles, which stimulates metaphor and projection. The birth of a human from its mother can be projected into the birth of an animal from its mother or a sprout from the earth. Similarly, the sacrifice of an animal or plant has been a stand in for human sacrifice. The sacrifice of Isaac was replaced by a ram, which mimes the gradual displacement of human with animal sacrifice.
Similarly, human death is often symbolized by a reaper, which cuts down grain. On the Death Tarot card, for example, the reaper cuts grass with heads of humans. This is reminiscent of the decapitated Green Man, whose head mimes the annual harvest and loss of (deer) antlers. On one level we see the conjunction of the Green Man’s decapitation with Christmas as an alignment with light cycles. On another level, we see his head as a synthesis of human, plant and animal life. The death and resurrection of this life is then synchronized with the cycles of light.
The human life cycle is a recurring pattern in mythic stories. Osiris, Attis, Inanna, Adonis, Christ, Dionysus—these myths are about death, resurrection and eternal life. The same can be said of Persephone, whose seasonal journey is through Hades, which is associated with winter. This can be seen in Dante’s Inferno, which, beneath the flames, is frozen. There at the base, it’s ice that traps the Christian devil—Dis—a name shared with Roman Hades. And it’s from this encounter with the bottom that Dante begins his ascent—not just to Heaven, but more specifically, to the desired destination of everlasting life. This is a Roman-Catholic version of the soul’s journey through the afterlife—not unlike the story of Orpheus or Osiris.
DATABASES
     A full-grown life-form will age then die. Such loss is replaced by an egg or flower, which is fertilized. The offspring then grows until born. From birth, the offspring matures until grown.  All life shares a journey from birth to death. The narrative experiences of mortal beginnings and ends has been a major conditioned factor through every stage of evolutionary, cultural and psychological development. By definition, this is true anywhere in the universe. The arc of life and death gives form to our own psyches, for which reason stories that engage this narrative pattern engage the patterns of our own psyches.
      The abstract pattern of the life cycle enables the alignment of specific life cycles, which stimulates metaphor and projection. The birth of a human from its mother can be projected into the birth of an animal from its mother or a sprout from the earth. Similarly, the sacrifice of an animal or plant has been a stand in for human sacrifice. The sacrifice of Isaac was replaced by a ram, which mimes the gradual displacement of human with animal sacrifice. 
Similarly, human death is often symbolized by a reaper, which cuts down grain. On the Death Tarot card, for example, the reaper cuts grass with heads of humans. This is reminiscent of the decapitated Green Man, whose head mimes the annual harvest and loss of (deer) antlers. On one level we see the conjunction of the Green Man’s decapitation with Christmas as an alignment with light cycles. On another level, we see his head as a synthesis of human, plant and animal life. The death and resurrection of this life is then synchronized with the cycles of light. 
     The human life cycle is a recurring pattern in mythic stories. Osiris, Attis, Inanna, Adonis, Christ, Dionysus—these myths are about death, resurrection and eternal life. The same can be said of Persephone, whose seasonal journey is through Hades, which is associated with winter. This can be seen in Dante’s Inferno, which, beneath the flames, is frozen. There at the base, it’s ice that traps the Christian devil—Dis—a name shared with Roman Hades. And it’s from this encounter with the bottom that Dante begins his ascent—not just to Heaven, but more specifically, to the desired destination of everlasting life. This is a Roman-Catholic version of the soul’s journey through the afterlife—not unlike the story of Orpheus or Osiris.
In biology, a biological life cycle (or just life cycle or lifecycle when the biological context is clear) is a series of changes in form that an organism undergoes, returning to the starting state. "The concept is closely related to those of the life history, development and ontogeny, but differs from them in stressing renewal."[1][2] Transitions of form may involve growth, asexual reproduction, or sexual reproduction.

In some organisms, different "generations" of the species succeed each other during the life cycle. For plants and many algae, there are two multicellular stages, and the life cycle is referred to as alternation of generations. The term life history is often used, particularly for organisms such as the red algae which have three multicellular stages (or more), rather than two.[3]

Life cycles that include sexual reproduction involve alternating haploid (n) and diploid (2n) stages, i.e., a change of ploidy is involved. To return from a diploid stage to a haploid stage, meiosis must occur.
Life cycle, in biology, the series of changes that the members of a species undergo as they pass from the beginning of a given developmental stage to the inception of that same developmental stage in a subsequent generation.

In many simple organisms, including bacteria and various protists, the life cycle is completed within a single generation: an organism begins with the fission of an existing individual; the new organism grows to maturity; and it then splits into two new individuals, thus completing the cycle. In higher animals, the life cycle also encompasses a single generation: the individual animal begins with the fusion of male and female sex cells (gametes); it grows to reproductive maturity; and it then produces gametes, at which point the cycle begins anew (assuming that fertilization takes place).
Can you imagine if humans were born as full grown adults? Thankfully, we are born as infants and slowly go through stages before reaching adulthood. These stages are called a life cycle. A life cycle is defined as the developmental stages that occur during an organism's lifetime. A life cycle ends when an organism dies.

In general, plants and animals go through three basic stages in their life cycles, starting as a fertilized egg or seed, developing into an immature juvenile, and then finally transforming into an adult. During the adult stage, an organism will reproduce, giving rise to the next generation.

A life cycle can be comprised of more than the three basic stages depending on the species. For example, the human life cycle is comprised of 5 main stages. The names of each stage can also vary slightly depending on the species. For example, an immature juvenile dragonfly is called a nymph.

The time an organism spends at each stage can differ. For example, one species of cicada can spend 17 years as an immature nymph. That is about the age we are when we graduate high school! Then once the cicada reaches adulthood, it only lives about 24 hours before it dies. Other organisms spend more time as adults. For example, elephants reach maturity after 15 years and then spend over 30 years as an adult.
noun, plural mor·tal·i·ties.
the state or condition of being subject to death; mortal character, nature, or existence.
the relative frequency of deaths in a specific population; death rate.
mortal beings collectively; humanity.
death or destruction on a large scale, as from war, plague, or famine.
Obsolete. death.
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