October Birth Flower: Marigold
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MARIGOLD

The marigold is the October birth flower. It is known for its vibrant orange color and is native to the Mediterranean. The first recorded cultivation of marigolds began with the Aztecs, who believed that the sunny flower possessed magical properties. Spanish conquistadors took these marigolds back with them to Spain where they were grown in monasteries.

From here, the marigold spread throughout Europe, and ultimately the rest of the world. Throughout history, marigolds have been used as dyes and as culinary ingredients, as well as a cure for many health ailments. In Mexico and Latin America, marigolds are used as a primary decoration for All Saints Day, where altars are embellished with these bright orange flowers. Today, the marigold is one of the most popular flowers in the United States.

With a bloom time that spans nearly the entire year, this October flower blooms from spring to fall and is one of the hardiest fall flowers. Avid gardeners plant marigolds due to their ability to repel insects and pests. Additionally, their odor can repel bacterial growth within the soil, keeping it healthy and nutritious for other plants.
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The marigold is the October birth flower. It is known for its vibrant orange color and is native to the Mediterranean. The first recorded cultivation of marigolds began with the Aztecs, who believed that the sunny flower possessed magical properties. Spanish conquistadors took these marigolds back with them to Spain where they were grown in monasteries.

From here, the marigold spread throughout Europe, and ultimately the rest of the world. Throughout history, marigolds have been used as dyes and as culinary ingredients, as well as a cure for many health ailments. In Mexico and Latin America, marigolds are used as a primary decoration for All Saints Day, where altars are embellished with these bright orange flowers. Today, the marigold is one of the most popular flowers in the United States.

With a bloom time that spans nearly the entire year, this October flower blooms from spring to fall and is one of the hardiest fall flowers. Avid gardeners plant marigolds due to their ability to repel insects and pests. Additionally, their odor can repel bacterial growth within the soil, keeping it healthy and nutritious for other plants.
The earliest known cultivation of marigolds began with The Aztecs, who considered marigolds as sacred and magical flowers primarily because of their medicinal properties. Early Spanish explorers then brought marigolds from the Aztecs back with them to Spain, where the plants were grown in monastery gardens. From there, marigold seeds reached France and northern Africa, and eventually the Americas and the rest of the world after several hundred years.

The common name Marigold originated from “Mary’s Gold,” since, back in the day, Virgin Mary’s altar received these flowers instead of coins as offerings. Meanwhile, in the UK, these flowers were called the “Rose of the Indies.” In India, the other known name of marigold is The Friendship Flower.
Marigolds traditionally symbolized despair and grief over a loved one. It may be surprising that such a cheerful flower is associated with the dead. However, for many cultures, its those neon-bright orange and yellow hues that represent the sunrays or light paths that guide their dearly departed.

The bright orange and yellow hues also represent the beauty and warmth of the rising Sun, and its power to resurrect.

Today, we often focus more on sunny colors of the marigold, representing optimism and prosperity.
Marigolds have been used for a wide variety of purposes throughout history. Ancient Greek and Roman cultures, as well as Indian and Middle Eastern cultures have all used marigolds for everything from treating various health ailments, dying fabrics, creating cosmetics and seasoning foods. It seems there is no need these adaptable flowers can’t fill. Marigolds are also one of the hardiest fall flowering plants.

With its intense color, it’s no wonder the marigold is the symbol of passion and creativity.

In Medieval England, the flowers and leaves of the marigold flowers, combined with ground eggshells, were added to heated ale and drank as a treatment for the plague.

In Asia, garlands of marigold flowers are used to decorate religious statues, and during funerals and wedding ceremonies.

During Mexico’s annual Dia de los Muertos celebration colorful garlands of marigold flowers adorn the graves of deceased relatives and elaborate altars constructed in the many homes. These altars are filled with favorite photos, toys and food items of the deceased. It is believed that the scent of the flowers help guide the spirits from the cemetery to the altars. The yellow and orange marigolds symbolize the sun and light.
King Midas was a king in ancient Greek mythology who could turn anything he touched into gold. King Midas received his gift of turning everything into gold from the Greek god Dionysus. Dionysus had a mentor named Silenus, who had gotten lost and was taken to King Midas for protection and shelter.

As King Midas enjoyed his newfound gift, not everyone was as happy with it. This included his daughter Marigold.

Marigold did not like that the flowers in the rose garden had lost their fragrance as they were now gold. King Midas went to console his daughter by giving her a hug. Unintentionally, King Midas turned his daughter to gold and was unable to turn her back.
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