November Birth Flower: Chrysanthemum
This portal was curated by:

CHRYSANTHEMUM

Meaning: The Chrysanthemum flower represents joy, longevity and prosperity. This is, in part, due to the sturdiness of the flower. It blooms during the colder months and brings a colorful beauty to a browning world. Several European cultures offer the white Chrysanthemum to the bereaved as a token of comfort.

Name Origin: Though the colors of the Chrysanthemum are now found in purples, mauves, sunny yellows, maroons, and cottony whites, the flower originated in golden hues. Known also as “mums,” the flower’s full name was coined by the famous taxologist Karl Linnaeus. Because the Chrysanthemum’s bloom hadn’t yet accumulated its array of colors, Linnaeus named it after the Greek words ‘chrysos,’ meaning ‘gold,’ and ‘anthemon’ meaning ‘flower.’

History: This flower has a delightfully long history, particularly in Asia, where it was discovered (and referenced in Chinese literature) over three thousand years ago. The Chinese loved the flower so much they named a city after it, Chu-Hsien, literally translated as ‘Chrysanthemum City.’ When the mum migrated to Japan in 400 A.D., the emperor became so enamored of it that he made the flower his official crest and seal.
DATABASES
Meaning: The Chrysanthemum flower represents joy, longevity and prosperity. This is, in part, due to the sturdiness of the flower. It blooms during the colder months and brings a colorful beauty to a browning world.  Several European cultures offer the white Chrysanthemum to the bereaved as a token of comfort. 

Name Origin: Though the colors of the Chrysanthemum are now found in purples, mauves, sunny yellows, maroons, and cottony whites, the flower originated in golden hues. Known also as “mums,” the flower’s full name was coined by the famous taxologist Karl Linnaeus. Because the Chrysanthemum’s bloom hadn’t yet accumulated its array of colors, Linnaeus named it after the Greek words ‘chrysos,’ meaning ‘gold,’ and ‘anthemon’ meaning ‘flower.’

History: This flower has a delightfully long history, particularly in Asia, where it was discovered (and referenced in Chinese literature) over three thousand years ago. The Chinese loved the flower so much they named a city after it, Chu-Hsien, literally translated as ‘Chrysanthemum City.’ When the mum migrated to Japan in 400 A.D., the emperor became so enamored of it that he made the flower his official crest and seal.
The chrysanthemum first came to Europe in the 17th century. People in Europe loved the flower too, and adopted various meanings for it over time.
– Victorians used chrysanthemums as a symbol of friendship.
– In Buddhist culture the chrysanthemum possesses a powerful Yang energy and is used as offerings to gods.
– In China, people traditionally give chrysanthemums to elderly people to wish them longevity or as a housewarming gift. It also signifies life and rebirth and has become a popular gift at baby showers and birthdays.
– In Australia, “mums” are the official flower for Mother’s Day, which falls on the second Sunday in May.
Chrysanthemums generally symbolize happiness, loyalty, and optimism, but the meanings may vary depending on the color of the petals.
– Red chrysanthemums is the symbol of pure love, deep passion and a perfect romantic gift.
– Yellow chrysanthemums signify unrequited love and grief.
– White chrysanthemums stand for devotion and honor.
– Purple chrysanthemums bring wellness, and are great get well gifts.
Red for love, white for truth, yellow for the slightest love, but in general, the Chrysanthemum symbolizes cheerfulness and optimism. The Chrysanthemum blooms in the fall, bringing extra cheer to a colder climate when most flowers take a break. Associated with the dead, this flower has popularity at funerals, or to the bereaved in time of need. From this popularity, it was once thought that bringing the Chrysanthemum indoors meant a wishful death. Originating in China, the Chrysanthemum is considered one of the four noble plants among bamboo, the plum, and the orchid. It was once thought that drinking from a stream that flowed between Chrysanthemums would help a person live to be 100. From this myth came Chrysanthemum tea, wine and medicine to encourage a healthy, long life.
The chrysanthemum’s mythology goes back to the 15th century before Christ with a history rich in stories and symbolism. Called after the Greek prefix “Chrys-”: signifying golden, referring to its original color and “-anthemion”, which means blossom. Many years of artistic growth have led to the emergence of a full-color variety ranging from white to purple to red.
Looking like daisies with a yellow core and an ornamental pompom, chrysanthemum is a symbol of optimism and joy. A flower of those who were born in November and the 13th wedding anniversary, chrysanthemum has also become the official flower of the town of Chicago. In Japan, they even have a “Festival of Happiness” celebrated annually for it. The Japanese consider it a symbol of the sun. They see the correct arrangement of chrysanthemum petals as representing perfection, while Confucius proposed that it should be kept as an item for practice and meditation.
In some countries of Europe (e.g., France, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Poland, Hungary, Croatia), incurve chrysanthemums symbolize death and are used only for funerals or on graves, while other types carry no such symbolism; similarly, in China, Japan, and Korea of East Asia, white chrysanthemums symbolize adversity, lamentation, and/or grief. In some other countries, they represent honesty.[18] In the United States, the flower is usually regarded as positive and cheerful,[19] with New Orleans as a notable exception.[20]

In the Victorian language of flowers, the chrysanthemum had several meanings. The Chinese chrysanthemum meant cheerfulness, whereas the red chrysanthemum stood for "I Love", while the yellow chrysanthemum symbolized slighted love.[21] The chrysanthemum is also the flower of November.[22]
Visit our special guest curator
Related Portals: