Mythology of:
The Vernal Equinox
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VERNAL EQUINOX

In India, the festival of Holi is celebrated coinciding with the spring equinox, or the moment when winter ends and spring begins, marking the victory of good over evil. The celebration of Easter among Christians takes place during this time of the year as it coincides with the celebration of the rebirth of Jesus. The festival of nowruz is celebrated in Iran during the spring equinox, marking the beginning of a new year. As per an ancient Persian belief, the mythological king of Persia took over the throne on this day. In Japan too, both the equinoxes around the year are celebrated as holidays when they worship their ancestors.
DATABASES
In India, the festival of Holi is celebrated coinciding with the spring equinox, or the moment when winter ends and spring begins, marking the victory of good over evil.  The celebration of Easter among Christians takes place during this time of the year as it coincides with the celebration of the rebirth of Jesus. The festival of nowruz is celebrated in Iran during the spring equinox, marking the beginning of a new year. As per an ancient Persian belief, the mythological king of Persia took over the throne on this day. In Japan too, both the equinoxes around the year are celebrated as holidays when they worship their ancestors.
NOWRUZ

Nowruz is an ancient festival marking the arrival of Spring that is celebrated in parts of the Middle East, Central Asia, South Asia, the Balkans, and East Africa. It dates back at least 3,000 years, and it was adopted and spread by the ancient Persian religion of Zoroastrianism, which the holiday is today often linked with. The Zoroastrian calendar was based on the passage of seasons, and Nowruz – which means “New Day” in Persian – is followed by the festival of Tirgan in summer, Mehregan in fall, and Yalda in winter.
HOLI:

Holi, Hindu spring festival celebrated throughout North India on the full-moon day of Phalguna (February–March). Participants throw coloured water and powders on one another, and, on this one day only, license is given for the usual rankings of caste, gender, status, and age to be reversed. In the streets the celebrations are often marked by ribald language and behaviour, but at its conclusion, when everyone bathes, dons clean white clothes, and visits friends, teachers, and relatives, the ordered patterns of society are reasserted and renewed. Holi begins on Sunday, March 28, 2021. Holi is particularly enjoyed by worshippers of the...
EASTER:

Easter is a Christian holiday that celebrates the belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ. In the New Testament of the Bible, the event is said to have occurred three days after Jesus was crucified by the Romans and died in roughly 30 A.D. The holiday concludes the “Passion of Christ,” a series of events and holidays that begins with Lent—a 40-day period of fasting, prayer and sacrifice—and ends with Holy Week, which includes Holy Thursday (the celebration of Jesus’ Last Supper with his 12 Apostles, also known as “Maundy Thursday”), Good Friday (on which Jesus’ crucifixion is observed) and Easter Sunday. Although a holiday of high religious significance in the Christian faith, many traditions associated with Easter date back to pre-Christian, pagan times.
EOSTRA:

There is very little information on the Goddess Ostara but a lot of her traditions live on in the modern day Easter. As a holiday, Easter predates Christianity, it was originally the name for the Spring Equinox. One of Ostara’s name variations, Esotara, slowly evolved into the modern name for this holiday, Easter. The name "Eostre" (Old Germanic "Ostara"), is related to that of Eos, the Greek goddess of dawn, her name can then be translated as East, Dawn or Morning Light. Ostara’s name is also the root of the word oestrogen.

Ostara is said to originate from Germany where it was said that she brought with her rebirth, renewal, and fertility to the land during the beginning of Spring. She was responsible for reawakening the earth and supporting the growth of new life. It was Ostara that warmed the winds, helped the trees to bud, and the snow to melt. Spring was seen as a time of hope after the harsh winters of ancient Europe. Ostara, and Spring,  was a sign that no matter what harshness or coldness covers the Earth, it will be reborn again.

Ancient Europeans especially saw Spring as a time to celebrate the return of the Sun and its warmth, after surviving the winter months. In areas with particularly harsh winters, the people would gnaw on bones to quench their hunger. And when Spring arrived, it brought with it the promise for a new life and happiness, food variety increases as animals are born and come out of hibernation and plants start to grow. The ancient people of Europe would have felt, relieved and joyful looking forward to the coming of the Goddess of Spring every year.
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