Mythology:
African Mythology
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AFRICAN MYTHOLOGY

African mythology covers a vast area. The African continent includes so many countries, regions, languages, tribes, cultures and crossovers that the sheer diversity of prevailing Gods would seem overwhelming if there weren’t a few handy shortcuts. Traditional African belief is overwhelmingly monotheistic. There may be spirits and ancestors floating around, but there’s only one God. Early missionaries made a complete pig’s ear of their research in this respect and seem to have delighted in cataloging as many ‘heathen’ Gods as they could possibly get away with. African Creator Gods seem to follow a distinctive pattern...
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African mythology covers a vast area. The African continent includes so many countries, regions, languages, tribes, cultures and crossovers that the sheer diversity of prevailing Gods would seem overwhelming if there weren’t a few handy shortcuts. Traditional African belief is overwhelmingly monotheistic. There may be spirits and ancestors floating around, but there’s only one God. Early missionaries made a complete pig’s ear of their research in this respect and seem to have delighted in cataloging as many ‘heathen’ Gods as they could possibly get away with. African Creator Gods seem to follow a distinctive pattern...
A vast and geographically varied continent, Africa is home to a great many cultures and to a thousand or more languages. Although no single set of myths and legends unites this diverse population, different culture groups and regions share some common elements. Like myths from other parts of the world, those of the African peoples reflect beliefs and values. But while the mythologies of many cultures are carefully preserved relics of ancient times, African myths and legends are still a meaningful part of everyday life. Some African myths deal with universal themes, such as the origin of the world and the fate of the individual after death. Yet many spring from the continent's own settings, conditions, and history...
African mythology commonly depicts the cosmos anthropomorphically. The human body is a microcosm that incorporates the same primordial elements and essential forces that make up the universe. Twinship is a predominant theme in much West African myth and ritual, because the human body is conceived as the twin of the cosmic body. According to the cosmogony shared by the Dogon, Bambara, and Malinke peoples of Mali, the primordial beings were twins, and twins therefore represent the ideal. Every individual shares in the structure of twinship. Following a birth, the placenta, which is believed to be the locus of one’s destiny and the soul’s twin...
The traditional beliefs and practices of African people like their history remains largely unfamiliar and unknown to the European and American public compared to more popular worldwide mythologies like Greeco-Roman and Pagan Germanic. This page deals with all tribes and cultures originating from Africa, except for the Ancient Egyptians. We should mention that like with the Native Americans, this page encompasses a huge array of different people grouped here together for the sake of convenience. Worth knowing is that a large portion of these stories are oral tradition that haven't survived to the present day or have been 'rewritten' with the introduction of the modern Abrahamic religions...
African folklore tales about animal tricksters often describe how helpless creatures manage to outwit fierce animals. One of the most important animal tricksters of West African legends is Anansi, who acts on behalf of the sky god, Nyame. Anansi became the King of All Stories after proving to Nyame that he could trick a jaguar, hornets and a fairy. Anansi is often depicted as a spider, a human or a combination of both...
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