Mythic month:
Black History Month
This portal was curated by:

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

We live in a society that has intentionally left Black narratives out of the American memoir while simultaneously standing on the backs and shoulders of Black individuals. Black people’s accomplishments and gains deserve a place in history outside of Black History Month. While highlighting our past achievements and benefactions is vital, charting a course forward for present and future generations to make history offers a unique and poignant investment. The collective idea is to recognize that Black history and Black people are a pivotal driving force that propels this nation forward, at every moment, even in the face of tremendous adversity. Black history is made every day, and we all should remember that year-round. 2020 was a year of awakening for corporations and brands...
DATABASES
We live in a society that has intentionally left Black narratives out of the American memoir while simultaneously standing on the backs and shoulders of Black individuals. Black people’s accomplishments and gains deserve a place in history outside of Black History Month. While highlighting our past achievements and benefactions is vital, charting a course forward for present and future generations to make history offers a unique and poignant investment. The collective idea is to recognize that Black history and Black people are a pivotal driving force that propels this nation forward, at every moment, even in the face of tremendous adversity. Black history is made every day, and we all should remember that year-round. 2020 was a year of awakening for corporations and brands...
February marks the start of Black History Month, a federally recognized celebration of the contributions that African Americans have made to this country and a time to reflect on the continued struggle for racial justice. The Black History Month 2021 theme, “Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity” explores the African diaspora, and the spread of Black families across the United States...
This week was chosen because it includes the birthdays of both Frederick Douglass, an abolitionist (someone who wanted to end the practice of enslaving people), and former U.S. president Abraham Lincoln. President Lincoln led the United States during the Civil War, which was primarily fought over the enslavement of Black people in the country. Many schools and leaders began recognizing the week after its creation...
Black History Month is meant to be a celebration of the achievements of Black Americans, in spite of our country’s history of blatant, intentional racism. Despite that intention, the American narrative surrounding the enslaving of Black Americans has always attempted to rewrite our past, generating a kinder, gentler image of slavery...
The story of Black History Month begins in Chicago during the summer of 1915. An alumnus of the University of Chicago with many friends in the city, Carter G. Woodson traveled from Washington, D.C. to participate in a national celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of emancipation sponsored by the state of Illinois. Thousands of African Americans travelled from across the country to see exhibits highlighting the progress their people had made since the destruction of slavery. Awarded a doctorate in Harvard three years earlier, Woodson joined the other exhibitors with a black history display. Despite being held at the Coliseum, the site of the 1912 Republican convention, an overflow crowd of six to twelve thousand waited outside for their turn to view the exhibits...
Visit our special guest curator
Related Portals:
 
Related Portals: