Myth of Time: Sunday
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SUNDAY

Named for the Sun and associated with the Greek god Helios and the Roman god Solis. These were the gods of the daytime. Sunday was identified with the color yellow, the heart in the body, and the metal gold (aurum), with the chemical symbol Au...
DATABASES
Named for the Sun and associated with the Greek god Helios and the Roman god Solis. These were the gods of the daytime. Sunday was identified with the color yellow, the heart in the body, and the metal gold (aurum), with the chemical symbol Au...
Sunday comes from Old English 'Sunnandæg,' which is derived from a Germanic interpretation of the Latin dies solis, 'sun's day.' Germanic and Norse mythology personify the sun as a goddess named Sunna or Sól...
From Middle English sunnenday from Old English sunnandæg ('day of the sun'), from sunne ('sun'), + dæg ('day'), late Proto-Germanic *sunnōniz dagaz, as a translation of Latin dies Solis and of Greek ήμέρα Ἥλιου (heméra Helíou); declared the 'venerable day of the sun' by Roman Emperor Constantine on March 7, 321 CE. Compare Dutch zondag, West Frisian snein, German Sonntag, Danish søndag...
HELIOS (Helius) was the Titan god of the sun, a guardian of oaths, and the god of sight. He dwelt in a golden palace in the River Okeanos (Oceanus) at the far ends of the earth from which he emerged each dawn, crowned with the aureole of the sun, driving a chariot drawn by four winged steeds. When he reached the the land of the Hesperides in the far West he descended into a golden cup which bore him through the northern streams of Okeanos back to his rising place in the East...
Sól is the much-revered goddess of the sun, and she was worshiped widely throughout Germany and Scandinavia. Her worship has ancient roots, and extends far back into the bronze age. In Eastern Europe she was known as Saulė or Saul, and is one of the principle deities in Latvian, Lithuanian and Baltic pagan traditions...
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