Morgana
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MORGANA

The Arthurian tradition typically portrays Morgan as a powerful sorceress, trained by Merlin, as well as the half sister of King Arthur. Not until the last one hundred lines do we discover that the old woman at the castle is Morgan le Faye and that she has controlled the poem’s entire action from beginning to end. As she often does in Arthurian literature, Morgan appears as an enemy of Camelot, one who aims to cause as much trouble for her half brother and his followers as she can.
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The Arthurian tradition typically portrays Morgan as a powerful sorceress, trained by Merlin, as well as the half sister of King Arthur. Not until the last one hundred lines do we discover that the old woman at the castle is Morgan le Faye and that she has controlled the poem’s entire action from beginning to end. As she often does in Arthurian literature, Morgan appears as an enemy of Camelot, one who aims to cause as much trouble for her half brother and his followers as she can.
In Arthurian legend, Morgan le Fay (/ˈmɔːrɡən lə ˈfeɪ/, meaning "Morgan the Fairy"), alternatively known as Morgan[n]a, Morgain[a/e], Morg[a]ne, Morgant[e], Morge[i]n, and Morgue[in] among other names and spellings (Welsh: Morgên y Dylwythen Deg, Cornish: Morgen an Spyrys), is a powerful enchantress. Early appearances of Morgan do not elaborate her character beyond her role as a goddess, a fay, a witch, or a sorceress, generally benevolent and related to King Arthur as his magical saviour and protector. Her prominence increased as legends developed over time...
Morgan le Fay /ˈmɔːrɡən lə ˈfeɪ/, alternatively known as Morgan le Faye, Morgen, Morgaine, Morgain, Morgana, Morganna, Morgant, Morgane, Morgne, Morge, Morgue, and other names, is a powerful enchantress in the Arthurian legend of the 6th century AD. Not to confused with Goddess Morrígan from Celtic pre-history c.15th century BC.

Early works featuring Morgan do not elaborate her character beyond her role as a enchantress or sorceress. She  became both more prominent and morally ambivalent in later texts, in particular in cyclical prose works such as the Lancelot-Grail and the Post-Vulgate Cycle, in which she turns into a dangerous enemy of King Arthur and antagonist of some tales.
Morgana, also known as Morgan le Fay, is a fairy queen and sorceress of Arthurian legend. She is one of three elder half-sisters to Arthur who are the daughters of Ygraine and Gorlois, the others being Morgause and Elaine. Morgana hated her half-brother Arthur nearly from the day he was born, and the legends are full of her attempts to bring his downfall. Like Vivian, she is said to have been a pupil of Merlin, and she is much associated with the magical island of Avalon.
Morgan le Fay, fairy enchantress of Arthurian legend and romance.

Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Vita Merlini (c. 1150) named her as the ruler of Avalon, a marvelous island where King Arthur was to be healed of his wounds, and it described her as skilled in the arts of healing and of changing shape. In Chrétien de Troyes’s romance of Erec (c. 1165), she first appeared as King Arthur’s sister. In 12th- and 13th-century elaborations of Arthurian legend, two themes, of healing and of hostility (owing to unrequited love), were developed: in the early 13th-century Vulgate cycle, for example, she was responsible for stirring up trouble between Arthur and his queen, Guinevere, yet finally appeared as a beneficent figure conveying Arthur to Avalon. Her magic powers were explained as learned from books and from the enchanter Merlin. Although later versions of the legend placed Arthur’s death in a Christian context, traditions of a living Arthur being tended by Morgan le Fay (until the time should come for him to return to his kingdom) survived in some 13th- and 14th-century texts, many of them associated with Sicily—perhaps taken there by Norman conquerors—where the term Fata Morgana is still used to designate a mirage sometimes seen in the Strait of Messina.
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