Month: January
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JANUARY

Janus and Jana, a pair of ancient Latin divinities, who were worshiped as the sun and moon, whence they were regarded as the highest of the gods, and received their sacrifices before all the others. The name Janus is only another form of Dianus, and Jana of Diana; but the ancients connected it also with janua (door), for it was also applied to a covered passage with two entrances, as the Janus medius in the Forum. The fact of Jana being identical in import with Luna and Diana is attested beyond a doubt by Varro. We stated above that Janus was regarded as identical with Sol, but this does not appear to have been the case originally, for it is related that the worship of Janus was introduced at Rome by Romulus, whereas that of Sol was instituted by Titus Tatius, and the priority of the worship of Janus is also implied in the story related by Macrobius...
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Janus and Jana, a pair of ancient Latin divinities, who were worshiped as the sun and moon, whence they were regarded as the highest of the gods, and received their sacrifices before all the others. The name Janus is only another form of Dianus, and Jana of Diana; but the ancients connected it also with janua (door), for it was also applied to a covered passage with two entrances, as the Janus medius in the Forum. The fact of Jana being identical in import with Luna and Diana is attested beyond a doubt by Varro. We stated above that Janus was regarded as identical with Sol, but this does not appear to have been the case originally, for it is related that the worship of Janus was introduced at Rome by Romulus, whereas that of Sol was instituted by Titus Tatius, and the priority of the worship of Janus is also implied in the story related by Macrobius...
Janus was the god of beginnings and transitions in Roman mythology, and presided over passages, doors, gates and endings, as well as in transitional periods such as from war to peace. He was usually depicted as having two faces looking at opposite ways, one towards the past and the other towards the future. There was no equivalent of Janus in Greek mythology. As a god of beginnings and transitions both in literal and abstract ways, he was also responsible for motion, changes, and time. He was present in the beginning of the world, guarding the gates of Heaven, and he also presided over the creation of religion, life, and even the gods. He was probably considered the most important Roman god, and his name was the first to be mentioned in prayers, regardless of which god the worshipper wanted to pray to...
Janus, in Roman religion, the animistic spirit of doorways (januae) and archways (jani). Janus and the nymph Camasene were the parents of Tiberinus, whose death in or by the river Albula caused it to be renamed Tiber. The worship of Janus traditionally dated back to Romulus and a period even before the actual founding of the city of Rome. There were many jani (i.e., ceremonial gateways) in Rome; these were usually freestanding structures that were used for symbolically auspicious entrances or exits. Particular superstition was attached to the departure of a Roman army, for which there were lucky and unlucky ways to march through a janus...
In ancient Roman religion and mythology, Janus is the god of beginnings and transitions, thence also of gates, doors, doorways, endings and time. He is usually a two-faced god since he looks to the future and the past. The Romans dedicated the month of January to Janus. His most apparent remnant in modern culture is his namesake, the month of January. Though he was usually depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions (Janus Geminus (twin Janus) or Bifrons), in some places he was Janus Quadrifrons (the four-faced). The Romans associated Janus with the Etruscan deity Ani...
In ancient Roman religion and mythology, Janus is the god of beginnings and transitions, thence also of gates, doors, doorways, endings and time. He is usually a two-faced god since he looks to the future and the past. The Romans dedicated the month of January to Janus. His most apparent remnant in modern culture is his namesake, the month of January. Though he was usually depicted with two faces looking in opposite directions (Janus Geminus (twin Janus) or Bifrons), in some places he was Janus Quadrifrons (the four-faced). The Romans associated Janus with the Etruscan deity Ani...
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