December Birth Flower: Narcissus
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NARCISSUS FLOWER

The narcissus is the December birth flower and symbolizes good wishes, faithfulness and respect. The narcissus can often be confused with the daffodil, the birth flower for March, which is a type of narcissus. Although most narcissus flowers are spring flowers, there are several species that bloom in the winter, such as the paperwhite narcissus — making it appropriate as the birth flower for December.

The December birthday flower has a rich history. As a native of the Mediterranean, the narcissus was brought over to Asia where it became widely cultivated in China. From there, the narcissus made its way into Europe via European colonists and eventually made its way into North America. Today, the narcissus is mainly cultivated in Great Britain, Holland, and The Channel Isles.
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The narcissus is the December birth flower and symbolizes good wishes, faithfulness and respect. The narcissus can often be confused with the daffodil, the birth flower for March, which is a type of narcissus. Although most narcissus flowers are spring flowers, there are several species that bloom in the winter, such as the paperwhite narcissus — making it appropriate as the birth flower for December.

The December birthday flower has a rich history. As a native of the Mediterranean, the narcissus was brought over to Asia where it became widely cultivated in China. From there, the narcissus made its way into Europe via European colonists and eventually made its way into North America. Today, the narcissus is mainly cultivated in Great Britain, Holland, and The Channel Isles.
Narcissus conveys that you want your beloved to stay just the way they are. 

While there are many types of flowers in the genus Narcissus (including the daffodil), the paperwhite is the winter-growing variety and the birth flower for December.
In Greek mythology, Narcissus (/nɑːrˈsɪsəs/; Ancient Greek: Νάρκισσος Nárkissos) was a hunter from Thespiae in Boeotia (alternatively Mimas or modern day Karaburun, Izmir) who was known for his beauty. According to Tzetzes, he rejected all romantic advances, eventually falling in love with his own reflection in a pool of water, staring at it for the remainder of his life. After he died, in his place sprouted a flower bearing his name.

The character of Narcissus is the origin of the term narcissism, a fixation with oneself. This quality, in turn, defines narcissism, a condition marked by grandiosity, excessive need for attention and admiration, and an inability to empathize.
Mythological meaning
A well- known myth surrounding the narcissus flower comes from Greek mythology. Narcissus was the son of the River God Cephissus and the nymph Liriope. He was an incredibly handsome young man who belittled those who loved him.

In the classic version of this tale by Ovid (a Roman poet), Narcissus was walking in the woods when a mountain nymph called Echo saw him. Attracted by his beauty she decided to follow him. When Narcissus shouted 'who's there?' Echo responded by repeating his words back to him because that's all she could do.
Historically the narcissus has appeared in written and visual arts since antiquity, being found in graves from Ancient Egypt. In classical Graeco-Roman literature the narcissus is associated with both the myth of the youth who was turned into a flower of that time, and with the Goddess Persephone, snatched into the underworld as she gathered their blooms. Narcissi were said to grow in meadows in the underworld. In these contexts they frequently appear in the poetry of the period from Stasinos to Pliny.

In western European culture narcissi and daffodils are among the most celebrated flowers in English literature, from Gower to Day-Lewis, while the best known poem is probably that of Wordsworth. The daffodil is the national flower of Wales, associated with St. David's Day. In the visual arts, narcissi are depicted in three different contexts, mythological, floral art, or landscapes, from mediaeval altar pieces to Salvador Dalí.
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