Artemis, Greek Goddess of the Wild
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ARTEMIS

Artemis, in Greek religion, the goddess of wild animals, the hunt, and vegetation and of chastity and childbirth; she was identified by the Romans with Diana. Artemis was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. Among the rural populace, Artemis was the favourite goddess. Her character and function varied greatly from place to place, but, apparently, behind all forms lay the goddess of wild nature, who danced, usually accompanied by nymphs, in mountains, forests, and marshes. Artemis embodied the sportsman’s ideal, so besides killing game she also protected it, especially the young; this was the Homeric significance of the title Mistress of Animals.
Artemis
DATABASES
Artemis, in Greek religion, the goddess of wild animals, the hunt, and vegetation and of chastity and childbirth; she was identified by the Romans with Diana. Artemis was the daughter of Zeus and Leto and the twin sister of Apollo. Among the rural populace, Artemis was the favourite goddess. Her character and function varied greatly from place to place, but, apparently, behind all forms lay the goddess of wild nature, who danced, usually accompanied by nymphs, in mountains, forests, and marshes. Artemis embodied the sportsman’s ideal, so besides killing game she also protected it, especially the young; this was the Homeric significance of the title Mistress of Animals.
Artemis
Symbols
    Bow and arrow
The site of the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus. Its final form was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
Didrachm from Ephesus, Ionia, representing the goddess Artemis
Silver tetradrachm of the Indo-Greek king Artemidoros (whose name means "gift of Artemis"), c. 85 BCE, featuring Artemis with a drawn bow and a quiver on her back on the reverse of the coin

According to the Homeric Hymn to Artemis, she had a golden bow and arrows, as her epithet was Khryselakatos ("of the Golden Shaft") and Iokheira ("showered by arrows"). The arrows of Artemis could also bring sudden death and disease to girls and women. Artemis got her bow and arrow for the first time from The Kyklopes, as the one she asked from her father. The bow of Artemis also became the witness of Callisto's oath of her virginity. In later cults, the bow became the symbol of waxing moon.[68]

    Chariots
Artemis' chariot was made of gold and was pulled by four golden horned deer (Elaphoi Khrysokeroi). The bridles of her chariot were also made of gold.[69]

    Spears, nets, and lyre
Although quite seldom, Artemis is sometimes portrayed with a hunting spear. Her cult in Aetolia, the Artemis Aetolian, showed her with a hunting spear. The description of Artemis' spear can be found in Ovid's Metamorphosis,[where?] while Artemis with a fishing spear connected with her cult as a patron goddess of fishing.[70] As a goddess of maiden dances and songs, Artemis is often portrayed with a lyre.[71]

    Deer
Deer were the only animals held sacred to Artemis herself. On seeing a deer larger than a bull with horns shining, she fell in love with these creatures and held them sacred. Deer were also the first animals she captured. She caught five golden horned deer called Elaphoi Khrysokeroi and harnessed them to her chariot.[69] The third labour of Heracles, commanded by Eurystheus, consisted of catching the Cerynitian Hind alive. Heracles begged Artemis for forgiveness and promised to return it alive. Artemis forgave him but targeted Eurystheus for her wrath.[72]

    Hunting dog
Artemis got her hunting dogs from Pan in the forest of Arcadia. Pan gave Artemis two black-and-white dogs, three reddish ones, and one spotted one – these dogs were able to hunt even lions. Pan also gave Artemis seven bitches of the finest Arcadian race. However, Artemis only ever brought seven dogs hunting with her at any one time.[73] 

And more...
"Pray give me eternal virginity; as many names as my brother Apollo; a bow and arrow like his; the office of bringing light; a saffron hunting tunic with a red hem reaching to my knees; sixty young ocean nymphs, all of the same age, as my maids of honour; twenty river nymphs from Amnisus in Crete, to take care of my buskins [boots] and feed my hounds when I am not out shooting; all the mountains in the world; and, lastly, any city you care to choose for me, but one will be enough, because I intend to live on mountains most of the time."

    (From Callimachus' Hymn to Artemis, quoted in Graves, 83)
Artemis' Portrayal and Symbolism

Sculptors, poets, and painters, however, had no such problems. Artemis is almost universally depicted as a young, beautiful and vigorous huntress carrying a quiver with arrows and holding a bow, typically wearing a short knee-high tunic and often accompanied by some animal (stag, doe, or hunting dogs). As a moon goddess, she is sometimes represented wearing a long robe and a crescent moon crown.
Artemis' Epithets

Homer calls Artemis either “The Mistress of Animals” or “She of the Wild.” As a huntress, she is also often referred to as “arrow-pouring” or “deer-shooting.” Just like her brother, she may be occasionally called “bright” or, even more, illustrative of her function as a moon goddess, “torch-bringer.”
Source: https://www.greekmythology.com/Olympians/Artemis/artemis.html
Artemis, as a goddess, was immortal and had a great deal of power over mortals and events on earth. In addition to the powers ordinary to all gods and goddesses, she possesses perfect aim with a bow, the ability to change herself and others into animals, and control disease and healing. One mortal who angered her was changed into a deer, chased down and torn to shreds by his own pack of hunting dogs.
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