All Souls' Day
This portal was curated by:

ALL SOULS' DAY

All Souls’ Day was first instituted at the monastery in Cluny in 993 CE and quickly spread throughout the Christian world. People held festivals for the dead long before Christianity. It was Saint Odilo, the abbot of Cluny in France, who in the 10th century, proposed that the day after All Saints’ Day be set aside to honor the departed, particularly those whose souls were still in purgatory. Today the souls of the faithful departed are commemorated. Although All Souls’ Day is observed informally by some Protestants, it is primarily a Roman Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox holy day.
DATABASES
All Souls’ Day was first instituted at the monastery in Cluny in 993 CE and quickly spread throughout the Christian world. People held festivals for the dead long before Christianity. It was Saint Odilo, the abbot of Cluny in France, who in the 10th century, proposed that the day after All Saints’ Day be set aside to honor the departed, particularly those whose souls were still in purgatory. Today the souls of the faithful departed are commemorated. Although All Souls’ Day is observed informally by some Protestants, it is primarily a Roman Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox holy day.
All Souls’ Day, in Roman Catholicism, a day for commemoration of all the faithful departed, those baptized Christians who are believed to be in purgatory because they died with the guilt of lesser sins on their souls. It is observed on November 2. Roman Catholic doctrine holds that the prayers of the faithful on earth will help cleanse these souls in order to fit them for the vision of God in heaven, and the day is dedicated to prayer and remembrance. Requiem masses are commonly held, and many people visit and sometimes decorate the graves of loved ones.
All Souls' Day, also known as the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed and the Day of the Dead, is a day of prayer and remembrance for the souls of those who have died, which is observed by Latin Catholics and other Christian denominations annually on November 2. All Souls' Day is often celebrated in Western Christianity; Saturday of Souls is a related tradition more frequently observed in Eastern Christianity. Practitioners of All Souls' Day traditions often remember deceased loved ones in various ways on the day.[3][4] Beliefs and practices associated with All Souls' Day vary widely among Christian denominations.
Both the Feast of All Saints and the Feast of All Souls evolved in the life of the Church independently of paganism and Halloween.  However, elements of pagan practices were perhaps “baptized” by some cultures or attached themselves to the celebration of All Saints and All Souls.

Let us first address the Feast of All Saints.  The exact origins of this celebration are uncertain, although, after the legalization of Christianity in 313, a common commemoration of the saints, especially the martyrs, appeared in various areas throughout the Church.  For instance in the East, the city of Edessa celebrated this feast on May 13; the Syrians, on the Friday after Easter; and the city of Antioch, on the first Sunday after Pentecost.  Both St. Ephrem (d. 373) and St. John Chrysostom (d. 407) attest to this feast day in their preaching.  In the West, a commemoration for all the saints also was celebrated on the first Sunday after Pentecost.
All Souls' Day is a Medieval-era church feast day meant to commemorate the dead. In Catholic and liturgical Protestant churches, certain saints are given specific feast days. All Saints' Day is for all the saints. All Souls' Day is for every believer.

The exact origin of All Souls' Day is unknown, but it isn't more than about 1200 years old. The Orthodox Church traces the first All Souls' Day to 893, when Emperor Leo VI was denied his request to dedicate a church to the memory of his late wife, and dedicated it to all Christian souls instead
Visit our special guest curator
Related Portals:
 
Related Portals: