All Saints Day
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ALL SAINTS DAY

All Saints' Day, also known as All Hallows' Day, the Feast of All Saints,[3][4] or Solemnity of All Saints, is a Christian solemnity celebrated in honour of all the saints of the church, whether they are known or unknown.[5]

From the 4th century, feasts commemorating all Christian martyrs were held in various places on various dates near Easter and Pentecost. In the 9th century, some churches in the British Isles began holding the commemoration of all saints on 1 November, and in the 9th century this was extended to the whole Catholic church by Pope Gregory IV.[6]
DATABASES
All Saints' Day, also known as All Hallows' Day, the Feast of All Saints,[3][4] or Solemnity of All Saints, is a Christian solemnity celebrated in honour of all the saints of the church, whether they are known or unknown.[5]

From the 4th century, feasts commemorating all Christian martyrs were held in various places on various dates near Easter and Pentecost. In the 9th century, some churches in the British Isles began holding the commemoration of all saints on 1 November, and in the 9th century this was extended to the whole Catholic church by Pope Gregory IV.[6]
All Saints’ Day, also called All Hallows’ Day, Hallowmas, or Feast of All Saints, in the Christian church, a day commemorating all the saints of the church, both known and unknown, who have attained heaven. It is celebrated on November 1 in the Western churches and on the first Sunday after Pentecost in the Eastern churches. In Roman Catholicism, the feast is usually a holy day of obligation.
All Saints' Day is a solemn holy day of the Catholic Church celebrated annually on November 1. The day is dedicated to the saints of the Church, that is, all those who have attained heaven. It should not be confused with All Souls' Day, which is observed on November 2, and is dedicated to those who have died and not yet reached heaven.

Although millions, or even billions of people may already be saints, All Saints' Day observances tend to focus on known saints --that is those recognized in the canon of the saints by the Catholic Church.

All Saints' Day is also commemorated by members of the Eastern Orthodox Church as well as some protestant churches, such as Lutheran and Anglican churches.
All Saints’ Day is also called All Hallows’ Day or Hallowmas. Some Christians celebrate this annual holiday right after Halloween, on Nov.1. In Old English, “All Hallows” means “the feast of the saints.” As the name implies, All Saints’ Day is the day to honor people who are believed to have gone to heaven because of God’s grace and good works. The following day is All Souls’ Day. Different from All Saints’ Day; All Souls’ Day is to commemorate martyrs who died but didn’t go to heaven. They may have not confessed their sins or free from publishments, but prayers could help them cleanse their venial souls.

The exact origins of All Saints’ Day and All Souls’ Day is unknown, but the tradition of remembering saints and martyrs started around the 4th century A.D. In 609 A.D., Pope Boniface IV decided to observe May 13 as the day to remember martyrs. Around 120 years later, when Pope Gregory III was reigning, he officially changed the name and date from May 13 to Nov. 1 to acknowledge all saints.
What is it? All Hallows Day or All Saints’ Day is an old Christian festival that is celebrated to honour all the Saints and Martyrs. It is the day after Halloween. Long after the establishment of Christianity in what were once Celtic lands, Pope Gregory III designated November 1 as a time to honour all saints and martyrs in the 8th Century. This was primarily done in order to overshadow the existing pagan festival at the time called Samhain (pronounced Sah-ween).
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